General – Page 2 – Innovita Research
December 4, 2019

Scientists use math to create personalized cancer therapies

Scientists are talking about personalized cancer treatment for decades. Each body is different and each cancer case is at least a little bit different, which is why personalized, custom-tailored treatment strategies are desired. And now this goal is coming closer to reality as scientists from the University of Waterloo found […]
December 3, 2019

Early immune response may improve cancer immunotherapies

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers and colleagues report a new mechanism for detecting foreign material during early immune responses. Viruses, bacteria and cancer have many ways to replicate and survive in our bodies. For viruses and bacteria, they invade […]
December 3, 2019

New Treatment Triggers Self-Destruction of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Pancreatic cancer is resistant to all current treatments. Patients have extremely poor chances of surviving for five years after being diagnosed. A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a small molecule has the ability to induce the self-destruction of pancreatic cancer cells. The research was conducted with xenografts — transplantations of […]
December 3, 2019

New research reveals how antiretroviral drugs may damage the hearts of infants exposed to HIV but uninfected

All babies born to mothers infected with HIV are exposed to the virus in utero, but not all of them become infected with it. Yet, all pregnant women in the U.S. with HIV receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), so both infected and uninfected babies exposed to HIV in utero are exposed […]
December 3, 2019

Turning Key Metabolic Process Back On Could Make Sarcoma More Susceptible to Treatment

Soft tissue sarcoma cells stop a key metabolic process which allows them to multiply and spread, and so restarting that process could leave these cancers vulnerable to a variety of treatments. The enzyme that controls the process is called FBP2, and researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of […]
December 3, 2019

Computer-generated antibiotics, biosensor Band-Aids, and the quest to beat antibiotic resistance

Imagine if a computer could learn from molecules found in nature and use an algorithm to generate new ones. Then imagine those molecules could get printed and tested in a lab against some of the nastiest, most dangerous bacteria out there—bacteria quickly becoming resistant to our current antibiotic options. Or […]
December 3, 2019

Loose Connections of Anxiety and Addiction

Binge drinking and alcoholism affect tens of millions of people throughout the country. While it’s certainly a social issue, research has shown that the behaviors and dependencies can have neurological roots. For her work investigating how alcohol and other commonly misused drugs hijack the brain’s adaptability — which leads to […]
December 3, 2019

Making higher-energy light to fight cancer

Materials scientists at the University of California, Riverside and The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated that it is possible to achieve photon up-conversion, the emission of light with energy higher than the one that excites the material, when using carefully designed structures containing silicon nanocrystals and specialized organic […]
December 2, 2019

Researchers identify new gene mutation in familial thyroid cancers

Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine identified a new gene mutation that may cause a type of familial thyroid cancer. Dr. Darrin Bann, an otolaryngology resident at the College of Medicine and lead author of the study, said that this mutation is the first and only mutation associated with familial thyroid […]
December 2, 2019

The risk of cancer diagnoses and death is likely overestimated

Cancer is  not a rare disease. Depending on your lifestyle, age, sex, genetics and many other factors, you can be likely to get cancer in your lifetime. But aren’t we overestimating the risk of this disease? Scientists from University of Sydney and Bond University say that estimates provided by Australian […]
December 2, 2019

New principle for activation of cancer genes discovered

Researchers have long known that some genes can cause cancer when overactive, but exactly what happens inside the cell nucleus when the cancer grows has so far remained enigmatic. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found a new mechanism that renders one canonical driver of cancer overactive. The […]
December 2, 2019

High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk

A diet high in fiber and yogurt is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers published in JAMA Oncology. The benefits of a diet high in fiber and yogurt have already been established for cardiovascular disease and gastrointestinal cancer. The new […]
December 2, 2019

Cancer Seems to Have Trouble Spreading in Microgravity

There are a number of health risks that come with going to space. Aside from the increased exposure to solar radiation and cosmic rays, there are the notable effects that microgravity can have on human physiology. As Scott Kelly can attest, these go beyond muscle and bone degeneration and include […]
November 29, 2019

New path forward for pancreatic cancer treatment

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers – by the time most cases are diagnosed, the cancer is advanced and spreading to other parts of the body. But what if these spreading cancer cells could, in fact, hold the key to guiding better treatment? Dr. Omid Faridani, recipient […]
November 29, 2019

Cards and board games help people staying mentally sharp later in life

Have you noticed that many older people love playing cards and board games. This is their way to socialize and have some fun. However, what they may not know is that this fun freetime activity also helps them protecting their thinking skills. This what a new study from the University […]
November 28, 2019

Study connects air pollution, memory problems and Alzheimer’s-like brain changes

Women in their 70s and 80s who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution experienced greater declines in memory and more Alzheimer’s-like brain atrophy than their counterparts who breathed cleaner air, according to USC researchers. The findings of the nationwide study, published in the journal Brain, touch on the […]
November 28, 2019

Camel Milk and Autism: Connecting the Genetic Dots

Most of us know camels as curiosities at zoos. As beasts of burden highly adapted to hot and dry climates, they’ve served the trade routes that helped build civilizations, and may indeed flourish in our increasingly hot and dry world. We value their hide, meat, and especially their milk. Camels […]
November 28, 2019

How do cytotoxic lymphocytes kill and do not get killed?

Cytotoxic lymphocytes are the real MVPs. They guard our bodies from cancerous and virus-infected cells by killing them. In this way they are aggressive defenders, but how their actions do not kill them? A new study from UCL might have found the answer. Cytotoxic lymphocytes to you may be better […]
November 28, 2019

Patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding may not need immediate colonoscopies

The timing of colonoscopy after acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding may not need to be rushed, according to a recent study in Japan. Researchers discovered no significant health differences between patients who received a colonoscopy within 24 hours of their arrival at the hospital and those who waited up to 96 […]
November 28, 2019

Portable photoacoustic breast imaging system shows promise during initial lab tests

A new, portable breast imaging system under development in Buffalo has the potential to better identify breast cancer in women with dense breast tissue. That is among the findings of a study published in the journal IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. The study was led by University at Buffalo researchers in […]
November 28, 2019

It’s About Time

Time can be measured in many ways: a watch, a sundial, the body’s natural circadian rhythms. What about the sexual behavior of a fruit fly? “If you ask a bunch of scientists whether animals can keep time, many would say they cannot—that things happen over time, but time itself is […]
November 28, 2019

Animal embryos evolved before animals

A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, has discovered that animal-like embryos evolved long before the first animals appear in the fossil record. Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or […]
November 27, 2019

Self-restrained genes enable evolutionary novelty

Changes in the genes that control development can potentially make large contributions to evolution by generating new morphologies in plants and animals. However, because developmental genes frequently influence many different processes, changes to their expression carry a risk of “collateral damage”. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding […]
November 27, 2019

Tracking inheritance of human mitochondrial DNA

New insight into how genetic information stored in human mitochondria is passed from one generation to the next could have important implications for genetic counseling of women planning pregnancies, according to a study by researchers at Penn State and the University of California, Berkeley. The findings are especially relevant to […]
November 27, 2019

Technique identifies T cells primed for certain allergies or infections

When your immune system is exposed to a vaccine, an allergen, or an infectious microbe, subsets of T cells that can recognize a foreign intruder leap into action. Some of these T cells are primed to kill infected cells, while others serve as memory cells that circulate throughout the body, […]
November 27, 2019

Vicious Circles: Ring-shaped DNA Provides Cancer Cells with a Malignant Twist

Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA encodes information, not only in its sequence but also in its shape. Building upon previous revelatory work, a team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California San Diego, the UC San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Stanford University and the […]
November 27, 2019

Blood test for deadly eye melanoma

A simple blood test could soon become the latest monitoring tool for the early detection of melanoma in the eye. University of Queensland scientists have discovered markers in the blood that can differentiate between a benign mole and a melanoma, while also identifying if the cancer has spread to other areas […]
November 27, 2019

Hitachi Developed Automation Technology of 3D Culture to Expand Regenerative Medicine Business

Hitachi, Ltd. has announced that Hitachi developed a new automation technology of 3D culture(2), solving problems of the previous 3D culture using Hitachi's Automated Cell Culture Equipment for iPS cells(3). Automation of both 2D culture(4) and 3D culture using this equipment makes it possible to automatic massive manufacture a variety […]
November 27, 2019

Ketamine might Help Treat Alcohol Addiction by Weakening Memories Associated with Drinking

Ketamine has recently been studied in terms of its antidepressant effects, with fairly promising results, yet some new studies have also pointed out its potential (yet admittedly mild and transient) side effects, putting more large-scale clinical deployment on hold. However, a new study published on Wednesday, 26 November 2019, in […]
November 27, 2019

MS linked to variant of common herpes virus through new method

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new method to separate between two different types of a common herpes virus (HHV-6) that has been linked to multiple sclerosis. By analyzing antibodies in the blood against the most divergent proteins of herpesvirus 6A and 6B, the researchers were able to show […]