Related Science News – Innovita Research

Related Science News

September 16, 2019

‘Tiny fat bubbles’ can boost immunity, calm disease

People living with inflammatory autoimmune disease could benefit from an ‘immune system reboot’, and researchers have isolated specific cells to target. The University of Queensland’s Professor Ranjeny Thomas said the research findings give hope for similar new immunotherapies for people with diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis. “People with these diseases currently […]
September 16, 2019

AI can predict the chances of surviving oral cancer

The chances of surviving oral cancers can be predicted by state of the art AI algorithms – developed by scientists at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Warwick – that precisely calculate the abundance of immune cells in the midst of tumour cells to help better understand […]
September 16, 2019

Scientists use CRISPR to Treat HIV for the First Time

The patient in question – a 27-year-old male citizen of China – was diagnosed with AIDS back in 2016, and two weeks later found out he also had lymphoblastic leukaemia. With prospects bleak, the patient was offered to receive a bone marrow transplant engineered with CRISPR-Cas9 to be free of […]
September 16, 2019

How cells translate genetic information

Researchers have identified another part of the machinery that cells use to efficiently and precisely turn DNA into protein. The two factors that were identified might be useful drug targets for new ways to treat bacterial infections. The genetic information coded in our DNA goes through multiple processing steps before […]
September 16, 2019

Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy

Allergy to peanut, which is often severe, is one of the most common food allergies in the United States. Although previous studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) — ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein —can desensitize adults and children and prevent life-threatening allergic reactions, the optimal duration […]
September 16, 2019

Breaking Down Barriers in the Fight Against Congenital Heart Disease

Academic research has long been characterized by silos and protective instincts. A new crop of fresh-thinking physician scientists are turning that model on its head, and the results are saving little hearts. More than 1 in every 110 babies is born with some form of congenital heart disease. CHDs are the […]
September 16, 2019

On-the-move cancer cells prefer a “comfort cruise,” follow predictable paths of least resistance

New research from a group of Vanderbilt biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they’re rather lazy in which paths they choose. According to the researchers, migrating cancer cells decide which path in the body to travel based on how much energy it takes, opting to […]
September 16, 2019

Childhood behaviour linked to taking paracetamol during pregnancy

The research published in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology examined whether there were any effects of taking paracetamol in mid-pregnancy and the behaviour of the offspring between the ages of 6 month and 11 years, with memory and IQ tested up until the age of 17.  Paracetamol is commonly used to relieve […]
September 16, 2019

Gene mutation discovery sheds light on organ failure affecting babies

A group of scientists and clinicians from the UK, the Netherlands, Italy and the USA have worked together and made an important discovery that explains an often fatal organ defect that affects unborn babies and children. Finding mutations of a key gene that controls how the urinary bladder grows before […]
September 13, 2019

Discovery concerning the nervous system overturns a previous theory

It appears that when our nervous system is developing, only the most viable neurons survive, while immature neurons are weeded out and die. This is shown in a ground-breaking discovery by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The results indicate that the long-standing neurotrophic theory, which states that chance determines […]
September 13, 2019

Using technology to detect autism sooner

While doctors agree that children can be diagnosed with autism as early as age two, the average age of diagnosis is about 4 years old. And for minority children, research indicates that age is much older. Yet the earlier children are diagnosed, the quicker they can take advantage of interventions […]
September 13, 2019

Scientists discover new breakthrough in cancer hair loss treatment

Scientists have determined a new way to protect the hair follicle from chemotherapy in an effort to prevent hair loss as a result of cancer treatments. Researchers based at The University of Manchester have discovered a new strategy for how to protect hair follicles from chemotherapy, which could lead to new treatments […]
September 13, 2019

Cancer drugs don’t always work as intended, researchers warn

Scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have identified 10 cancer drugs currently in clinical trials that do not work how clinicians thought they would. In identifying what went wrong, experts can now work to improve drug discovery and personalized medicine. The discovery started out with an entirely different goal. […]
September 13, 2019

Sneaky Spread

Metastasizing breast cancers typically seek out the bones, lung and brain. Brain metastases are especially dangerous; many people survive for less than a year after diagnosis. How is the cancer able to get past the blood-brain barrier? And can it be blocked? Those questions led Harvard PhD candidate Golnaz Morad and her […]
September 13, 2019

Tissue Type

The KRAS gene is one of the commonly mutated genes in cancer. More than 40 percent of colorectal cancers have a mutated KRAS gene, or oncogene, that is at least partially responsible for cancer development. Mutated KRAS genes are commonly found in other cancers as well, including pancreatic, lung, myeloma and endometrial, and not all KRAS mutations in […]
September 12, 2019

Calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss associated with Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia but the changes in brain cell function underlying memory loss remains poorly understood. Researchers at the University of Bristol have identified that calcium channel blockers may be effective in treating memory loss. The team's findings, published in Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, […]
September 12, 2019

Breakthrough stem cell platform could shed light on mysteries of early human development

A new method for making stem cell colonies that mimic parts of early human development could help investigate important questions in maternal and child health, such as: What chemicals pose risks to developing embryos, and what causes certain birth defects and multiple miscarriages? The technique, developed at the University of […]
September 12, 2019

Young transplant recipient gets 3-D models of his damaged heart

When Mason Thomas needed a heart transplant at age six, he asked to see his damaged heart so he could understand what was wrong with it, but the old organ was discarded after the surgery. Today, two years later, Mason got his wish, thanks to an innovative project by a […]
September 12, 2019

CAR T-Cell Therapy May Be Harnessed to Treat Heart Disease

CAR T-cell therapy, a rapidly emerging form of immunotherapy using patients’ own cells to treat certain types of cancers, may be a viable treatment option for another life-threatening condition: heart disease. In a first-of-its-kind study, published in Nature, researchers at Penn Medicine used genetically modified T cells to target and remove activated […]
September 12, 2019

Infant with Deadly Leukemia Saved by Drug for Adult Liver Cancer

UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals have successfully treated a months-old infant with a rare childhood leukemia using a targeted therapy approved for adults with inoperable liver cancer and advanced kidney cancer. The decision to use the drug, sorafenib, was made after pathologists identified a unique mutation in the form of two […]
September 11, 2019

Preliminary Study Suggests that the Body’s “Epigenetic Clock” might be Reversible

Efforts to extend the human lifespan, or in more exotic cases – even to achieve immortality, have recently been rejuvenated by a small clinical trial which demonstrated that the body’s “epigenetic clock” which measures a person’s biological age might be amenable to successful pharmaceutical manipulation. In the trial, published on […]
September 11, 2019

Existing drug could treat aggressive brain cancer

A research team from the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center has found that a compound molecule used for drug delivery of insulin could be used to treat glioblastoma, an aggressive, usually fatal form of brain cancer. Glioblastoma, also known as GBM, is a fast-growing, web-like tumor that arises from supportive […]
September 11, 2019

Is treatment forever? Success of gene therapy for inherited blindness depends on timing

Nearly two decades ago, a gene therapy restored vision to Lancelot, a Briard dog who was born with a blinding disease. This ushered in a period of hope and progress for the field of gene therapy aimed at curing blindness, which culminated in the 2017 approval of a gene therapy […]
September 11, 2019

How babies absorb calcium could be key to treating osteoporosis in seniors

New research reveals the mechanism that allows breastfeeding babies to absorb large amounts of calcium and build healthy bones—a discovery that could lead to treatment for osteoporosis and other bone diseases later in life. “We build our bone mineral density until we’re early adults and then stop, so we think […]
September 11, 2019

Poor Motor Skills Predict Long-Term Language Impairments For Children with Autism

Fine motor skills – used for eating, writing and buttoning clothing – may be a strong predictor for identifying whether children with autism are at risk for long-term language disabilities, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study, in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, highlights the association between fine motor skills […]
September 10, 2019

Ancient pathway uncovers calcium’s role in egg development

A new study of fruit flies (Drosophila) uncovers an ancient and fundamental mechanism that provides details into a long-standing mystery of reproductive biology. The results, which are relevant to higher animals including humans, add to a growing body of evidence in other organisms about the role of calcium in the […]
September 10, 2019

Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer

Cancer is relentless and resilient. When a drug blocks a cancer cell’s main survival pathway, the cell avoids the obstacle by taking different pathways or detours to save itself. This tactic is called “developing resistance,” and it’s one of the key challenges researchers face when seeking effective therapeutics to combat […]
September 10, 2019

Protein Mapping Pinpoints Why Most Metastatic Melanoma Patients Do Not Respond to Immunotherapy

Tel Aviv University and Sheba Medical Center researchers say they have discovered why more than half of patients with metastatic melanoma do not respond to immunotherapy cancer treatments. Wielding proteomics, an innovative “protein mapping” approach, a team of researchers led by Prof. Tami Geiger, Prof. Gal Markel, and Dr. Michal Harel of TAU's Sackler School of […]
September 9, 2019

FAK Protein Linked to Chemotherapy Resistance in Ovarian Cancer

Although the number of women being diagnosed and dying of ovarian cancer is declining, recurrence, drug resistance and mortality remain high for women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most common form of epithelial ovarian cancer. A new study in the journal eLife by University of California San Diego School of Medicine […]
September 9, 2019

Synthetic Biologists Extend Functional Life of Cancer-Fighting Circuitry in Microbes

Bioengineers and biologists at the University of California San Diego have developed a method to significantly extend the life of gene circuits used to instruct microbes to do things such as produce and deliver drugs, break down chemicals and serve as environmental sensors. Most of the circuits that synthetic biologists […]