Related Science News – Page 14 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

October 11, 2018

Evidence Grows

The results of a study led by Harvard Medical School researchers based at Massachusetts General Hospital support evidence from previous studies suggesting the regular use of aspirin can reduce the risk of developing primary liver cancer, also called hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Analyzing data from two long-term epidemiologic studies, the team […]
October 11, 2018

Decision Support Tool Boosts Genetic Testing Knowledge in Breast Cancer Patients

Genetic testing after a breast cancer diagnosis can offer clues to individualized treatment decisions for a patient and her treatment team. But many patients aren’t aware it exists and could be missing out on that opportunity, according to a new study published in Cancer. A team at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer […]
October 11, 2018

Testing new drugs with “ALS-on-a-chip”

There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease that gradually kills off the motor neurons that control muscles and is diagnosed in nearly 6,000 people per year in the United States. In an advance that could help scientists develop and test new drugs, MIT engineers have designed […]
October 11, 2018

Latest Cornell dot features a new cancer weapon: antibodies

Antibody-based imaging of a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer is undergoing clinical trials worldwide, but the path from trial to application is being hampered by a major obstacle: safety. Concerns stem from inefficient tumor targeting, which can result in accumulation in the bone marrow, liver and kidneys of the […]
October 10, 2018

Asthma may contribute to childhood obesity epidemic

Toddlers with asthma are more likely to become obese children, according to an international study led by USC scientists. The finding is a turnabout for children’s health as obesity has often been seen as a precursor to asthma in children, not the other way around. The study, conducted by a […]
October 10, 2018

Gene therapy breakthrough in treating rare form of blindness

The trial involved 14 patients receiving a single injection into the back of the eye of a virus containing the missing gene and began in 2011 at the Oxford Eye Hospital – part of the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. By the end of the study there was a […]
October 10, 2018

Stanford shows that breast cancers punch tunnels into neighboring tissue

Cancers pose the greatest danger when they become invasive and then spread from their originating tissues throughout the body. Although scientists have long known that cells have a chemical means of breaking free, Stanford researchers have discovered that breast cancer cells can also physically push their way out of their […]
October 10, 2018

Largest ever diabetes genetics study uncovers mechanisms behind type 2 diabetes

A study published in the journal Nature Genetics used genetic data from nearly a million people across Europe and North America to highlight some of the key ways in which type 2 diabetes develops, and to find several genes which could be attractive targets for the creation of new therapeutic drugs. Together […]
October 10, 2018

Child maltreatment linked to cognitive aging

Almost 10 million older adults in the U.S. have cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, or other related dementias. Penn State researchers are looking into how early life adversity, specifically child maltreatment, can affect cognitive aging later in life in a new project. According to Chad Shenk, associate professor of human development […]
October 10, 2018

Immunotherapy effective against hereditary melanoma

Congenital mutations of the CDKN2A gene are the strongest known risk factors for inherited skin cancer. Individuals with melanoma who carry mutations in this gene also have poor prognosis, according to previous research. Melanoma that has metastasised has a limited response to traditional chemotherapy. In recent years, new immunological treatments […]
October 10, 2018

Day-time naps help us acquire information not consciously perceived, study finds

The Medical Research Council-funded study, led by University of Bristol researchers, aimed to understand whether a short period of sleep can help us process unconscious information and how this might affect behaviour and reaction time. The findings further reveal the benefits of a short bout of sleep on cognitive brain function and found that even during short bouts […]
October 10, 2018

Neuron death in ALS more complex than previously thought

Brown University researchers have uncovered new clues about the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a surprisingly common disease that causes the death of motor neurons that control voluntary muscles such as those involved in walking, talking, chewing or breathing. A team led by Anne Hart, a professor of neuroscience […]
October 9, 2018

The Kidney Project and the bioartificial pancreas: When inspiration strikes twice

Inspiration can be a hard thing to find. The history of science is filled with elusive “eureka moments” taking place under unlikely circumstances—Archimedes’ jump in a bath to intuit displacement, Issac Newton’s observation of a falling apple to grasp gravity, and Nikola Tesla’s inspiration for the electric induction motor, which […]
October 9, 2018

Inflammatory marker tied to kidney decline in healthy adults

A large, multiethnic study of healthy individuals found that high blood levels of an inflammatory marker are linked with long-term decline of kidney function. The results may shed light on biological mechanisms that spur chronic kidney disease. The findings were published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Research was […]
October 9, 2018

Etched glass project illuminates microscopic disease to promote health literacy

Her father’s cancer diagnosis threw Kimberly Moss into a world of unknowns and anxiety. Moss, an assistant professor of art and visual culture and coordinator of the biological and premedical illustration program at Iowa State University, has an extensive background as a medical illustrator. But she wasn’t prepared for the complexity of esophageal cancer, […]
October 9, 2018

Scientists map brain region linked to Alzheimer’s and other diseases

USC scientists have created the most detailed atlas yet of the hippocampus, the brain’s memory bank. Using fluorescent tracers and 3D animation, the scientists show structures, nerve connections and functions in vivid detail. The study appeared in the journal Nature Neuroscience. “Like a new atlas, we’ve constructed the most detailed diagram of […]
October 8, 2018

Immune cells help older muscles heal like new

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have found a critical component for growing self-healing muscle tissues from adult muscle—the immune system. The discovery in mice is expected to play an important role in studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tissue grafts in future cell therapy applications. The […]
October 8, 2018

Portable cancer test uses smartphone, new gold biosensor

Early diagnosis of cancer greatly improves the odds of successful treatment. Yet many people, especially in developing countries, lack access to facilities to detect the disease. To address this issue, a University at Buffalo-led research team is creating a new cancer-spotting tool that health care providers could eventually use in […]
October 8, 2018

Discovering a single cell that leads to relapse

New research from the Abramson Cancer Center identified a rare cause for relapse in leukemia: a single leukemic cell engineered for CAR T therapy and infused back into the patient. The findings, published in Nature Medicine, showed that the CAR lentivirus that usually enters a T cell to teach it to hunt cancer […]
October 8, 2018

Old drug could have new use helping sick premature babies

Researchers from The University of Western Australia, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Curtin University are investigating whether an old drug could be used to help very sick premature babies. In a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology the researchers examine the use of a drug called pentoxifylline in pre-term […]
October 5, 2018

Young cancer survivors struggle to imagine their life in the future

Surviving cancer is a huge achievement and a relief. It opens up a future of possibilities, it changes your perspective to life and can be motivating. However, many people find themselves disoriented and confused after undergoing a successful cancer treatment. In fact, scientists from the University of New South Wales […]
October 5, 2018

Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division

One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This can happen if something goes wrong during cell division, and it can lead to infertility, miscarriages, birth defects, or cancer. An estimated 30 percent of miscarriages are due […]
October 5, 2018

Tales from 141,430 and one genomes

Analysis of the world’s largest set of genome data from pregnant women, totaling 141,431 expectant mothers from across China, has uncovered unsuspected associations between genes and birth outcomes, including the birth of twins and a woman’s age at first pregnancy. The analysis also allowed researchers to reconstruct the recent movement […]
October 4, 2018

One more year of high school may shape waistlines later in life

What a difference a year of high school can make — for long-term health. In 1972, England, Scotland and Wales raised the mandatory school attendance age from 15 to 16. Through a large-scale genetic study, USC Dornsife researchers have found that decades later, the change had a health benefit for […]
October 4, 2018

Scientists develop mouse ‘embryo-like structures’ with organisation along body’s major axes

A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has developed an artificial mouse embryo-like structure capable of forming the three major axes of the body. The technique, reported today in the journal Nature, could reduce the use of mammalian embryos in research. The definitive architecture of the mammalian body is […]
October 4, 2018

Livesaving Facts About Aortic Dissection

Aortic dissection occurs when weakened layers of the aorta — the body’s main artery — pull apart or tear, trapping blood between layers. This further weakens the aorta and may cause it to rupture. “An acute aortic dissection is a very lethal condition,” says Bo Yang, M.D., a cardiac surgeon at the University […]
October 4, 2018

Older Adults Have High Interest in Genetic Testing — and Some Reservations

Only a fraction of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested —either for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry or out of curiosity — but far more have an interest in pursuing such tests. One in 10 older adults have taken genetic tests offered directly to consumers, and […]
October 4, 2018

Ovarian Cancer Survivor: Early Detection, Attitude Are Crucial

Robin Kingsbury spends the bulk of her time helping others. So when a swollen lymph node in her right groin began hurting in January 2017, it was hard to slow down and take notice. With a blended family of five kids plus elderly in-laws to take care of, the busy […]
October 3, 2018

Breastfeeding changes gene activity that may make babies less reactive to stress

It has long been known that there are many physical and mental health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. But can these benefits be due to genetic changes induced by breastfeeding? New research suggests that connection. The research, published in the edition of Pediatrics, was led by Barry M. Lester, Ph.D, […]
October 3, 2018

Disease causing mutation found in French-Canadians

A team of Canadian scientists, including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) has discovered the first French-Canadian founder mutation gene linked to synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Parkinson’s disease (PD), dementia with Lewy-Bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). The mutation, known as […]