Related Science News – Page 3 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

July 4, 2019

Treatment target pinpointed for liver cancer in young adults

New findings show how a genetically aberrant, fused protein promotes a rare form of liver cancer in adolescents and young adults. The researchers also saw that a certain mix of drugs could target the fused protein and the enzymes that it recruits.  In the lab, this drug combination slowed down […]
July 4, 2019

Scientists find thirdhand smoke affects cells in humans

Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found. The finding could assist physicians treating patients exposed to thirdhand smoke. “Our data show that cells […]
July 4, 2019

Simpler name for cancer genetic syndrome could save lives

As medical science links certain genetic mutations with a greater variety of cancers, the names for these risk syndromes are falling out of step. It’s more than just a name. These outdated designations could keep the tests from being offered to many people and families whose health is at stake […]
July 4, 2019

NIH study finds long-term increased risk of cancer death following common treatment for hyperthyroidism

Findings from a study of patients who received radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment for hyperthyroidism show an association between the dose of treatment and long-term risk of death from solid cancers, including breast cancer. The study, led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of […]
July 3, 2019

Tapping into the Way Cells Communicate

A new technology discovered by a team including UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time – providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue. Kshitiz, an assistant professor (who goes by just his first […]
July 3, 2019

Perfectly punctual or fashionably late, it takes all kinds of stem cells to build a kidney

Arriving early or late can have big consequences for early-stage cells that gather to form a new kidney, USC researchers discovered. The scientists showed how progenitor cells that form the kidney’s filtering units, called nephrons, mature into entirely different types of cells based on when they reach the scene of […]
July 3, 2019

Certain cells secrete a substance that may head off Alzheimer’s

USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain’s vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay. The finding, in a mouse model of the human brain, focuses on a specific cell called a pericyte and reveals that it plays previously unknown […]
July 3, 2019

Stem cells moonlight to protect the stomach from bacterial invaders

Our mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to numerous bacterial species, some of which can induce DNA damage in host cells. Normally this remains inconsequential, as the rapid turnover of the mucosa means damaged cells are shed within days. However, if the long-lived stem cells that continually give rise to new […]
July 3, 2019

Neutral evolution shapes lifespan and ageing

Different African killifish species vary extensively in their lifespans – from just a few months to several years. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne investigated how different lifespans have evolved in nature and discovered a fundamental mechanism by which detrimental mutations accumulate in the […]
July 3, 2019

Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a protein associated with neurodegeneration

Understanding the normal molecular interactions could aid in the development of therapeutics to prevent the formation of clumps associated with ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Most of the well-studied proteins in our bodies are like metal; some can change shape easily, like aluminum foil, and others are rigid, like steel beams, […]
July 3, 2019

Protein Clumps in ALS Neurons Provide Potential Target for New Therapies

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological condition that affects motor neurons — the nerve cells that control breathing and muscles. Under a microscope, researchers have noticed that the motor neurons of patients with ALS contain excessive aggregation of a protein called TDP-43. Since TDP-43 proteins stuck in these aggregates […]
July 3, 2019

Competition leads to fathers who produce more male sperm

New research led by The University of Western Australia has shown that the social conditions that a male experiences while growing up can influence the amount of X and Y chromosome sperm that he produces as an adult. The findings, published in Evolution Letters, provide insight into how exposure to […]
July 3, 2019

Study reveals roots of Parkinson's in the brain

Researchers from King’s College London have uncovered the earliest signs of Parkinson’s disease in the brain, many years before patients show any symptoms. The results, published in The Lancet Neurology, challenge the traditional view of the disease and could potentially lead to screening tools for identifying people at greatest risk. […]
July 3, 2019

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

From a biological standpoint, the earliest stages of life are the most mysterious. A developing human embryo undergoes a flurry of rapid changes, and these changes are exceedingly difficult to study because they transpire within the confines of a womb. But with new technology, it might soon be possible to […]
July 3, 2019

Size Matters: New Data Reveals Cell Size Sparks Genome Awakening in Embryos

Transitions are a hallmark of life. When dormant plants flower in the spring or when a young adult strikes out on their own, there is a shift in control. Similarly, there is a transition during early development when an embryo undergoes biochemical changes, switching from being controlled by maternal molecules […]
July 3, 2019

A molecular link between memory and pain

Sortilin, which is a receptor expressed on the surface of nerve cells, plays a central role in memory and is now shown surprisingly also to be crucial in pain development in laboratory mice – and in all likelihood in humans as well. This is the main conclusion of the study […]
July 3, 2019

A Decade of Change: Advances in the Classification and Known Causes of Brain Tumors

For many years, the classification of gliomas relied largely on the cells’ general appearance, or histological characteristics, as seen under a microscope. Today, our understanding of glioma subtypes has expanded to include the molecular and genetic variants that can influence a tumor’s development, prognosis, and response to treatment. Until recently, […]
July 3, 2019

New study challenges claim that exogenous RNA is essential for sperm function

Scientists from the University of Bath are challenging the claims of two high profile papers from 2018 which reported that in the mouse, RNA has to be added to sperm for them to be fully fertile. The Bath findings undermine a proposed mechanism of epigenetic inheritance in which offspring inherit […]
July 3, 2019

Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS

A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. ALS patients are categorized either as familial – meaning […]
July 3, 2019

Decoding Cells to Unlock Stem Cells' Potential

Stem cells are jacks of all trades, capable of alleviating the consequences of such diverse pathologies as heart attacks, strokes and cancer. However, stem cell therapies have been hampered by possible side effects, which are frequently hard to predict. One way around this conundrum is to understand how stem cells […]
July 3, 2019

Yale doctors crack the code of a rare, inherited anemia

Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the human body, an essential function for survival. Anemia results when someone has fewer red blood cells than normal. The world’s most common blood disorder, anemia comes in many different varieties — mild to severe, acquired or genetic. Yale pediatrician and geneticist Patrick Gallagher, M.D., […]
July 3, 2019

Study finds electronic cigarettes damage brain stem cells

A research team at the University of California, Riverside, has found that electronic cigarettes, often targeted to youth and pregnant women, produce a stress response in neural stem cells, which are critical cells in the brain. Present throughout life, stem cells become specialized cells with more specific functions, such as […]
July 2, 2019

Cancer cell’s “self eating” tactic may be its weakness

Cancer cells use a bizarre strategy to reproduce in a tumor’s low-energy environment; they mutilate their own mitochondria! Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) also know how this occurs, offering a promising new target for pancreatic cancer therapies. Why would a cancer cell want to destroy its own functioning […]
July 2, 2019

Researchers unlock mysteries of complex microRNA oncogenes

MicroRNAs are tiny molecules of nucleic acid that control gene expression, acting like a dimmer switch to tone down gene output at key positions in the network of information that governs a cell’s function. MicroRNAs are important for the day-to-day inner working of cells and especially important during development. They […]
July 2, 2019

Stanford develops ‘autofocals’ – glasses that track your eyes to focus on what you see

By using eye-tracking technology to automatically control a pair of autofocus lenses, engineers have created a prototype for “autofocals” designed to restore proper vision in people who would ordinarily need progressive lenses. Though it may not have the sting of death and taxes, presbyopia is another of life’s guarantees. This […]
July 2, 2019

Boosting the cancer-destroying ability of killer T-cells

The team of researchers discovered that increasing the amount of the molecule L-selectin on T-cells can vastly improve their ability to fight solid tumours. Professor Ann Ager, from Cardiff University’s Systems Immunity Research Institute, said: “These results mean that immunotherapy could be used to fight most cancers. This is great […]
July 2, 2019

Moments of Clarity, Glimmers of Hope

It happens unexpectedly: a person long thought lost to the ravages of dementia, unable to recall the events of their lives or even recognize those closest to them, will suddenly wake up and exhibit surprisingly normal behavior, only to pass away shortly thereafter. This phenomenon, which experts refer to as […]
July 2, 2019

Does Anesthesia, Invasive Surgery Increase Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Risk?

A recent Multiple Sclerosis Journal study that included data from 281 patients and 609 surgeries suggests post-operative MS relapse risk does not significantly differ from pre-operative relapse risk. No prior studies have systematically investigated the influence of surgery or anesthesia administration on relapse risk, but it’s a large concern in clinical practice. This […]
July 1, 2019

Protein-linked sugars are crucial for the uptake of proteins linked to Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that affects more than 6 million people worldwide, is caused by the buildup of alpha-synuclein proteins in the brain. The biological function of alpha-synuclein is still not well understood, but because of its role in neurodegenerative diseases, researchers are actively studying this protein to understand […]
July 1, 2019

New research raises possibility of better anti-obesity drugs

Effective weight-loss strategies call for eating less food, burning more calories — or ideally, both. But for the more than 90 million Americans who suffer from obesity, a disease that contributes to conditions ranging from heart disease to cancer, behavioral change is hard to accomplish or not effective enough, which […]