Related Science News – Page 180 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

February 13, 2020

Childhood brain tumor discovery may unlock new treatments for many cancers

A surprising discovery about a rare form of childhood brain cancer suggests a new treatment approach for that cancer – and potentially many others. Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the supposedly simple cancer, called medulloblastoma, forms an unexpectedly intricate network to drive its […]
February 13, 2020

Using bone's natural electricity to promote regeneration

Materials with special electric properties can help promote bone's natural healing processes. Some materials show promise promoting bone regeneration by enhancing its natural electrical properties, according to a review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. Some solids, including bone, enamel and quartz, form an electric field when […]
February 13, 2020

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola

Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Yale scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer — elements of the Ebola virus. “The irony is that one of the world’s deadliest viruses may be useful in treating one of the deadliest […]
February 13, 2020

Investigational drugs didn’t slow memory loss, cognitive decline in rare, inherited Alzheimer’s, initial analysis indicates

An international clinical trial evaluating whether two investigational drugs can slow memory loss and cognitive decline in people in the early stages of a rare, inherited form of Alzheimer’s disease has yielded disappointing results, an initial analysis of the data has shown. However, the researchers continue to explore data from […]
February 13, 2020

Novel melatonin receptor molecules make possible therapies that adjust biological clocks to our environments

Like breathing or blinking, behaviors regulated by our circadian rhythms, such as digestion and sleep-wake cycles, go unnoticed by most people. But when circadian rhythms malfunction, the result can be any one of a broad range of serious, chronic disorders, from insomnia and depression to obesity, diabetes, and bipolar disorder. […]
February 13, 2020

Gut microbe imbalance may stunt CF babies’ growth

Altering the gut microbiome might become a therapy for improving growth during infancy in cystic fibrosis patients. The composition of the gut microbiome may make a difference in height gain in infants with cystic fibrosis during their first year of life, according to a new study. Many babies with cystic […]
February 13, 2020

ORNL researchers develop ‘multitasking’ AI tool to extract cancer data in record time

As the second-leading cause of death in the United States, cancer is a public health crisis that afflicts nearly one in two people during their lifetime. Cancer is also an oppressively complex disease. Hundreds of cancer types affecting more than 70 organs have been recorded in the nation’s cancer registries—databases […]
February 12, 2020

More than Just a Carnival Trick: Researchers Can Guess Your Age Based on Your Microbes

Our microbiomes — the complex communities of microbes that live in, on and around us — are influenced by our diets, habits, environments and genes, and are known to change with age. In turn, the makeup of our microbiomes, particularly in the gut, is well-recognized for its influence on our […]
February 12, 2020

Scientists uncover molecular ‘first responder’ that triggers heart-attacking causing plaques

Oxford University scientist have discovered the molecular ‘first responder’ which detects disturbances in the flow of blood through the arteries, and responds by encouraging the formation of plaques which can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke and even death. The study, published in the journal Nature, found that mice […]
February 12, 2020

From detecting lung cancer to spotting counterfeit money, this new imaging technology could have countless uses

SC scientists have developed a new tool to peer more deeply and clearly into living things, a visual advantage that saves time and helps advance medical cures. It’s the sort of foundational science that can be used to develop better diagnostics and treatments, including detecting lung cancer or damage from […]
February 12, 2020

Handheld 3D Printer Accelerates the Healing of Severe Skin Burns

Researchers from the University of Toronto Engineering and Sunnybrook Hospital have developed a novel type of handheld 3D printer capable of depositing uniform sheets of skin to cover large burn wounds, while its “bio ink” has been shown to accelerate the healing process. Writing in the journal Biofrabrication, the researchers […]
February 12, 2020

FSU researchers look to natural products to shed light on protein interactions in cancer, neurological diseases

A fungus that attacks almond and peach trees may be key to identifying new drug targets for cancer therapy. A team of Florida State University researchers from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry found that a natural product from the fungus Fusicoccum amygdali stabilizes a family of proteins in the […]
February 12, 2020

Long-Term Learning Requires New Nerve Insulation

Most memories fade in a matter of days or weeks, while some persist for months, years, or even for life. What allows certain experiences to leave such a long-lasting imprint in our neural circuits? This is an age-old question in neurobiology that has never been resolved, but new evidence is […]
February 11, 2020

Superior “Bio-Ink” for 3D Printing Pioneered

Rutgers biomedical engineers have developed a “bio-ink” for 3D printed materials that could serve as scaffolds for growing human tissues to repair or replace damaged ones in the body. The study was published in the journal Biointerphases. Bioengineered tissues show promise in regenerative, precision and personalized medicine; product development; and basic research, […]
February 11, 2020

Accelerating Children’s Access to New Treatments for High Risk Brain Tumors

For children with high-risk brain tumors that resist standard therapy, the next step is often enrolling in a clinical trial. But connecting these young patients with the most promising therapies in the world is often a complicated and lengthy process. To address this challenge, an elite, global network of children’s […]
February 11, 2020

Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?

It’s no coincidence that some of the worst viral disease outbreaks in recent years — SARS, MERS, Ebola, Marburg and likely the newly arrived 2019-nCoV virus — originated in bats. A new University of California, Berkeley, study finds that bats’ fierce immune response to viruses could drive viruses to replicate […]
February 10, 2020

Exceptionally Long Lived Humans Exhibit Slower Epigenetic Aging, Measured by DNA Methlyation Clocks

Epigenetic clocks are produced by examining age-related changes in DNA methylation, finding combinations of such changes that are consistent across populations, and predict chronological age. These clocks also predict mortality, in the sense that people with higher epigenetic than chronological age tend to have a higher mortality risk, or be more burdened […]
February 10, 2020

Study: Two Enzymes Control Liver Damage in NASH

As much as 12 percent of adults in the United States are living with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an aggressive condition that can lead to cirrhosis or liver cancer. After identifying a molecular pathway that allows NASH to progress into liver cell death, University of California San Diego School of Medicine […]
February 10, 2020

Human Gut-in-a-Dish Model Helps Define ‘Leaky Gut,’ and Outline a Pathway to Treatment

Once a vague scapegoat for a variety of ills, increasing evidence suggests a condition known as “leaky gut” — in which microbes and other molecules seep out of the intestines — may be more common, and more harmful, than previously thought. Leaky gut is most often experienced by older people, […]
February 10, 2020

Anti-Leukemia Compound Induces Complete Remission in Mouse Models

An anti-cancer compound developed at the University of Michigan has shown “profound” activity in mouse models against two subtypes of leukemia — representing up to 40% of patients — a U-M research team reports in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The compound, dubbed MI-3454, inhibits the protein-protein interaction between menin and Mixed Lineage […]
February 10, 2020

Researchers learn how the cancer-causing stomach bacterium Helicobacter maintains its shape

NSF-funded scientists reporting in the journal eLife have revealed that they are closer to understanding a risk factor for stomach cancer: how the bacterium Helicobacter pylori maintains its shape. About half the world's population is chronically infected with H. pylori, a bacterium whose helical, or corkscrew, shape allows it to burrow into the mucus lining of […]
February 10, 2020

Protein closely linked to commonest cause of blindness

An international team of scientists has identified a protein which is strongly linked to the commonest cause of blindness in developed countries when its levels are raised in the blood. The discovery is a major step forward in the understanding of age-related macular degeneration, which affects 1.5 million people in […]
February 10, 2020

Garvan contributes to global cancer genome ‘map’

A ‘biobank’ of pancreatic tumour samples, administered by the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, has contributed to the most comprehensive database of cancer genomes in the world to date. The Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) contributed 175 genomes to the Pan-Cancer Project, a global effort that has created a resource […]
February 10, 2020

CRISPR-Edited Immune Cells Can Survive and Thrive After Infusion into Cancer Patients

Genetically-edited immune cells can persist, thrive, and function months after a cancer patient receives them, according to new data published by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. The team showed cells removed from patients and brought back into the lab setting were […]
February 10, 2020

Blood test reveals infant risk of developing asthma

In a new study, researchers from DTU and the research unit for childhood asthma COPSAC have—as the first in the world—showing that immune system responses in children as young as 18 months can be used to predict the risk of them developing intermittent or persistent asthma. The method used by […]
February 10, 2020

How some mammals pause their pregnancies

How do some mammals postpone the development of their embryos to await better conditions for having offspring?  A recent study at the UW Medicine Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine explored this reproductive enigma, which can occur in more than 130 species of mammals as well as in some […]
February 7, 2020

Researchers discover intricate process of DNA repair in genome stability

An elaborate system of filaments, liquid droplet dynamics and protein connectors enables the repair of some damaged DNA in the nuclei of cells, researchers at the University of Toronto have found. The findings further challenge the belief that broken DNA floats aimlessly – and highlight the value of cross-disciplinary research […]
February 7, 2020

Endocrine Disruptors: Rescue Attempt

From plastics to pesticides, it seems like every week delivers fresh news about the dangers of endocrine disruptors—chemicals in the environment that alter the body’s hormones and can lead to reproductive, developmental, neurologic and immune problems and cancer. Industry regulation and individual consumer choice can reduce exposure to such chemicals, […]
February 7, 2020

Noise-induced hearing loss blocked with drug compound

Loud noise can damage the inner ear and cause hearing loss. Studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Iowa have shown that a drug compound can block damage caused by loud noise, raising the possibility of medication that prevents noise-induced hearing […]
February 7, 2020

Gene ID’d as potential therapeutic target for dementia in Parkinson’s

Dementia is one of the most debilitating consequences of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition characterized by tremors, stiffness, slow movement and impaired balance. Eighty percent of people with Parkinson’s develop dementia within 20 years of the diagnosis, and patients who carry a particular variant of the gene APOE are at especially […]