Related Science News – Page 74 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

October 28, 2019

Zebrafish discovery throws new light on human hearing disorders

A study of the genetic make-up of zebrafish has provided brand new insights into the cause of congenital hearing disorders in humans. A team including scientists from Cardiff University has identified how specific genes can dictate the patterns of the tiny cells – so-called hair cells – within our ears […]
October 28, 2019

Study finds beta blockers ineffective in stopping COPD flare-ups

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), which includes lung diseases such as emphysema and asthma, is the third leading cause of death of people worldwide. COPD patients can experience exacerbations, or intense “flare-ups,” of their conditions leading to hospitalization, breathing tube intubation and even death. A new study co-led by University of Minnesota School of […]
October 27, 2019

Scientists found a virus that could be causing liver cancer in cats

Cancer is a terrible disease, affecting humans and animals. Its exact causes and mechanism is still poorly understood, but in some cases it can be triggered by a virus. For example, now scientists from The University of Sydney found that a virus may be causing liver cancer in companion cats. […]
October 24, 2019

Biologists build proteins that avoid crosstalk with existing molecules

Inside a living cell, many important messages are communicated via interactions between proteins. For these signals to be accurately relayed, each protein must interact only with its specific partner, avoiding unwanted crosstalk with any similar proteins. A new MIT study sheds light on how cells are able to prevent crosstalk […]
October 24, 2019

New study reveals why breast cancer spreads to the brain

Most cancers kill because tumor cells spread beyond the primary site to invade other organs. Now, a USC study of brain-invading breast cancer cells circulating in the blood reveals they have a molecular signature indicating specific organ preferences. The findings, which appeared in Cancer Discovery, help explain how tumor cells […]
October 24, 2019

Scientists pioneer new way of finding cancer-causing germs

Scientists at the University of East Anglia are pioneering a new way of finding the bacteria and viruses associated with cancer. Some infections have already been linked with cancers including stomach cancer and cervical cancer. New research published in Genome Biology shows how genomic data collected from tumours could be sequenced […]
October 24, 2019

Sequencing Plays Role in Treating High Risk Pediatric Brain Tumors

They’re among the most ruthless opponents for pediatric oncologists: brain tumors that can’t be surgically removed or that resist standard therapies. Doctors have limited weapons to fight them, contributing to why brain cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. But some institutions are re-thinking their approach. […]
October 24, 2019

A ‘thoughtful’ workout goes beyond physical benefits

Running and lifting weights might be a crucial step in helping your body delay the effects of aging, but those exercises may be only part of the story. In a new article published in Psychological Bulletin, a University of Georgia researcher found that the type of activity you choose may also have […]
October 24, 2019

Research identifies earlier origin of neural crest cells

Neural crest cells — embryonic cells in vertebrates that travel throughout the body and generate many cell types — have been thought to originate in the ectoderm, the outermost of the three germ layers formed in the earliest stages of embryonic development. But the capacity of neural crest cells to […]
October 24, 2019

Yale Cancer Center scientists build genomic research platform to help treat cervical cancer

Yale Cancer Center scientists have built a powerful genomic research platform to study cervical cancer, a disease that often is untreatable if it progresses after surgery or primary chemo-radiation treatment. The work is described in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). “We have identified […]
October 24, 2019

New organelle that helps prevent cancer discovered inside our cells

Scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered a strange new organelle inside our cells that helps to prevent cancer by ensuring that genetic material is sorted correctly as cells divide. The researchers have connected problems with the organelle (a subcellular structure) to a subset of breast cancer […]
October 23, 2019

High blood pressure at maximal exercise may signal good fitness

Is it dangerous to have high blood pressure when exercising? “It depends”, is the answer from a newly published study. One important parameter used to give a prognosis or diagnosis in several conditions is blood pressure during exercise. A new study led by LiU scientist Kristofer Hedman shows that high […]
October 23, 2019

New study may have the reason why heart medication gives muscle pain

A study from McMaster has found a potential mechanism explaining why some people who take drugs to lower their cholesterol develop sore, aching muscles. The use of statin drugs to significantly lower cholesterol, and ultimately reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, has become widespread and large-scale studies suggest that nearly […]
October 23, 2019

How Stem Cells Make Decisions

If you’re a human embryonic stem cell — and who among us hasn’t been — the G1 (“Gap 1”) phase of development is an important time. For the first few hours of this phase that occurs within the larger process of the cycle of cell division, you’re deliberating the nature […]
October 23, 2019

Mending Broken Hearts with Neural Crest Cells

Zebrafish—striped fish a few centimeters long—have the ability to regrow up to 20 percent of their hearts after sustaining major damage. Now, Caltech scientists have discovered that embryonic cells from the hindbrain, called neural crest cells, migrate to the developing heart and form heart muscle in zebrafish and other species. […]
October 23, 2019

New biomarkers for childhood asthma may facilitate early diagnosis

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have followed children who have sought emergency care for wheezing during their first years of life and found specific biomarkers that can predict the need for asthma medication several years later. The study is published in the prestigious European Respiratory Journal. Today, biomarkers for asthma are […]
October 23, 2019

Walking ability, cognitive function key for people with MS to participate in social life

People with multiple sclerosis who can walk at a relatively normal speed and effectively process information are more likely to continue to participate in social activities, according to a new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal. The findings highlight the importance of […]
October 23, 2019

A rat race to investigate resilience

Could an animal’s personality and problem-solving skills help it to cope with environmental adversity? Cairns animal behaviourist, Dr Tasmin Rymer, is working with Australian native rats to identify the characteristics that make some individuals better able to cope and survive in damaged and changed environments than others. The James Cook […]
October 22, 2019

Wake-Up Call: Cellular Sleep Isn't As Harmless As Once Thought

New research into the mechanics of cellular sleep and shutdown could shed light on the aging process and how to potentially intervene. A University of Arizona-led research team challenged the traditional understanding of cellular sleep and discovered new information that could lead to  interventions in the aging process. As we […]
October 22, 2019

People with atopic eczema have more S. aureus bacteria in their skin

People with atopic eczema have many more Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in their skin than those with healthy skin or psoriasis, according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of Helsinki in Finland. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows how the S. aureus bacteria […]
October 22, 2019

New diagnostic method finds aggressive tumours

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new cheap method that can identify highly heterogeneous tumours that tend to be very aggressive, and therefore need to be treated more aggressively. The technique is presented in the scientific journal Nature Communications. A common feature of cancer cells is alterations in the […]
October 22, 2019

Keeping Time

For all the attention the human microbiome has been getting over the last few years, one aspect of the research rarely makes headlines: the difficulty of observing how the microbiome changes over time in response to various stimuli. The most common analysis method is extracting bacteria from fecal samples and […]
October 21, 2019

Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade

Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic. The team carried out experiments with a human breast cancer tumor that developed in the lab. As […]
October 21, 2019

Could young blood hold secrets to longer, healthier life?

In what sounds like a scene from a science fiction movie, researchers in 2005 stitched together with old and young mice so they shared a circulatory system. Youthful blood seemingly rejuvenated many tissues of the elderly rodents, boosting their cognitive and physical performance. Now, scientists are examining whether certain molecules […]
October 21, 2019

Investigating human infertility via the water flea

With significant funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington is investigating fundamental biological processes that lead to fertility problems in humans. Sen Xu, assistant professor of biology at UTA, received a five-year, $1.89 million grant from the NIH to use […]
October 21, 2019

BARseq builds a better brain map

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Professor Anthony Zador has taken the next step in his quest to solve exactly how the brain is wired. Zador, a neuroscientist whose lab studies how the brain’s circuitry mediates and controls complex behaviors, set out about 10 years ago to map three pillars of brain function: connectivity, […]
October 21, 2019

Male and Female Mice Have Different Brain Cells

Caltech researchers have discovered rare brain cell types that are unique to male mice and other types that are unique to female mice. These sex-specific cells were found in a region of the brain that governs both aggression and mating behaviors. The study was done as a collaboration between the […]
October 21, 2019

Breast Cancer Genetic Testing for All Women?

“I have no family history of breast cancer,” says the woman in a public service announcement stressing the importance of mammograms for all women. “No one in my family had breast cancer. Not one. But I start chemo next week,” says the woman in another PSA. Unfortunately, people paying only partial attention, […]
October 21, 2019

Genes Linked to Sex Ratio and Male Fertility in Mice

One of the more recent trends among parents-to-be is the so-called gender reveal, a party complete with pink or blue cake to answer the burning question, “Is it a boy or girl?” After all, it’s presumed that there’s a 50-50 chance you’d have one or the other. In a new article […]
October 21, 2019

“Back in Time”: Researchers Unravel the Early Makings of an Exhausted T Cell

The immune system struggles to defeat cancer or chronic infections because many of the T cells that leap into action end up “exhausted,” rendering them ineffective against disease. That path to exhaustion and what triggers it is a crucial one that researchers aim to better understand so they can stop […]