Related Science News – Page 95 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

May 4, 2021

Traffic-related pollution linked to early markers for cardiovascular disease in children

Daily exposure to auto emissions during childhood may set the stage for cardiovascular disease in later life, according to a USC Children’s Health Study that followed 70 children into young adulthood. The research, published in the journal Environmental Health, used ultrasound to examine the carotid arteries in participants at age 10 […]
May 4, 2021

New drug class gives hope to some ovarian cancer patients

A study published in Nature Communications shows that the drug rucaparib has been effective in treating certain types of ovarian cancers if used early in treatment, after a diagnosis, and before the cancer cells build up a resistance to chemotherapy. Rucaparib is in a relatively new class of drugs – Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or […]
May 4, 2021

Chemical ‘nose’ sniffs critical differences in DNA structures

Small changes in the structure of DNA have been implicated in breast cancer and other diseases, but they’ve been extremely difficult to detect — until now. Using what they describe as a “chemical nose,” UC Riverside chemists are able to “smell” when bits of DNA are folded in unusual ways. […]
May 4, 2021

Researchers develop new smell test for Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and COVID-19

A new smell test developed by Queen Mary University of London researchers has been found to be easy to use in patients with Parkinson’s disease, and could also be helpful in diagnosing COVID-19 in the broader population. Smell tests have the potential to support the diagnosis of certain neurological conditions, […]
May 4, 2021

Prior SARS-CoV-2 infection rescues B and T cell responses to variants after first vaccine dose

A single dose of vaccine boosts potent responses against SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus variants in those with previous COVID-19, a study has found. In those who have not previously been infected and have so far only received one dose of vaccine the immune response to variants of concern may be insufficient. The […]
May 4, 2021

Genetics, not environment of the uterus, controls abnormal development

Yale researchers have shown that developmental abnormalities, including those that lead to pregnancy loss and autism, are controlled by the genetics of the fetus and placenta — and not the mother’s intrauterine environment. The findings are reported in the online edition of the journal Placenta. One out of every 33 […]
May 4, 2021

Project to read genomes of all 70,000 vertebrate species reports first discoveries

It’s one of the most audacious projects in biology today—reading the entire genome of every bird, mammal, lizard, fish, and all other creatures with backbones. And now comes the first major payoff from the Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP): near complete, high-quality genomes of 25 species, including the greater horseshoe bat, […]
May 4, 2021

The micro-environment of breast cancer in three dimensions

Cancerous tumors thrive on blood, extending their roots deep into the fabric of the tissue of their host. They alter the genetics of surrounding cells and evolve to avoid the protective attacks of immune cells. Now, Penn State researchers have developed a way to study the relationship between solid, difficult-to-treat […]
May 4, 2021

Skin and bones repaired by bioprinting during surgery

Fixing traumatic injuries to the skin and bones of the face and skull is difficult because of the many layers of different types of tissues involved, but now, researchers have repaired such defects in a rat model using bioprinting during surgery, and their work may lead to faster and better […]
May 3, 2021

Ingredient in Indian Long Pepper Shows Promise Against Brain Cancer in Animal Models

Penn scientists use cryo-electron microscopy to illuminate how piperlongumine works against glioblastoma. Piperlongumine, a chemical compound found in the Indian Long Pepper plant (Piper longum), is known to kill cancerous cells in many tumor types, including brain tumors. Now an international team including researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine […]
May 3, 2021

Breaking the egg barrier: A sperm story

Sperm doesn’t shift into high gear in mammals just to show off, new research shows. It originally needed that extra speed to break the egg barrier. Later on, evolution enabled sperm to use its souped-up swimming to navigate tricky reproductive pathways even before reaching the egg. That is the finding […]
April 30, 2021

Vaccinated pregnant women pass antibodies to their babies

Women who receive COVID-19 mRNA vaccines produced by Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna while in their third trimester of pregnancy generate a strong immune response and pass protective antibodies through umbilical cord blood to their babies, according to a study conducted by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers, published in Obstetrics & Gynecology. […]
April 30, 2021

Ultra-high field MRI detects subtle differences in structure and function of brain’s ‘hippocampus’ in people with Down syndrome

Using ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with Down syndrome (DS), researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus—a region of the brain tied to memory and learning. Such […]
April 30, 2021

Research will test more sensitive ways to diagnose rare diseases

Adding RNA sequencing to current genetic methods could help diagnose and treat thousands of patients with mystery diseases. Imagine having a terrible medical condition and not knowing what it was. More than 400,000 Albertans have a rare disease. Many of them face challenges getting the right diagnosis, let alone finding […]
April 30, 2021

Research project examines male pregnancy and microbes in fish

A research project from the lab of University of Oregon evolutionary biologist Bill Cresko is setting out to explore the effects of a remarkable evolutionary innovation: male pregnancy in seahorses, pipefish and seadragons. “This is an amazingly diverse family of fish, and some species are the only vertebrates in which […]
April 30, 2021

NEI 3-D Retina Organoid Challenge (3-D ROC), Phase III

The National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is seeking in vitro, stem-cell-derived 3-D human retina organoids. The goal of the challenge is to generate concrete prototypes of 3-D systems that model the cellular organization and function of the human retina. NEI is seeking innovative solutions […]
April 30, 2021

Human genome editing requires difficult conversations between science and society

In October of 2020, Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle Charpentier were awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their discovery of an adaptable, easy way to edit genomes, known as CRISPR, which has transformed the world of genetic engineering. CRISPR has been used to fight lung cancer and correct the mutation […]
April 30, 2021

New mouse model provides first platform to study late-onset Alzheimer’s disease

University of California, Irvine biologists have developed a new genetically engineered mouse model that, unlike its predecessors, is based on the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease. The advance holds promise for making new strides against the neurodegenerative disease as cases continue to soar. Their study appears in the journal, Nature […]
April 30, 2021

Anemia discovery points to more effective treatment approaches

A combination of inexpensive oral medications may be able to treat fatigue-inducing anemias caused by chronic diseases and inflammation, a new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. This type of anemia is the second-most common kind, and it can be an added burden for organ-transplant recipients and […]
April 30, 2021

Innovative cancer therapy uses immune system to attack tumours

Imagine if you could re-engineer your immune system to target and attack cancer growing in your body. A new clinical trial led by a clinician-researcher at the University of Alberta is doing just that. Michael Chu, an assistant professor of oncology in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading a […]
April 29, 2021

Smart Cell Therapies for Solid Cancers Ready to Move Towards Clinical Trials

Immunotherapies that fight cancer have been a life-saving advancement for many patients, but the approach only works on a few types of malignancies, leaving few treatment options for most cancer patients with solid tumors. Now, in two related papers published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers at UCSF have demonstrated how to […]
April 29, 2021

Study strengthens links between red meat and heart disease

The research is presented at ESC Preventive Cardiology 2021, an online scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and published in the journal Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine. Study author Dr Zahra Raisi-Estabragh from Queen Mary’s William Harvey Research Institute said: “Previous studies have shown links between greater red meat […]
April 29, 2021

Surgical procedure may help restore hand and arm function after stroke

Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. Of these, approximately 80% lose arm function and as many as 50-60% of this population still experience problems six months later. Traditionally, stroke patients try to regain motor function through physical rehabilitation, where patients re-learn pre-stroke skills, such as eating […]
April 29, 2021

Scientists uncover secret of the hunger switch in the brain

A new study published in Science, has revealed how the master switch for hunger in the brain, the melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4), works. The research team, including scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science, Queen Mary University of London and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, also clarified how this switch is […]
April 29, 2021

Study: Many children with cardiomyopathy have a genetic mutation but few are screened

A national, University at Buffalo-led study on genes in pediatric cardiomyopathy demonstrates strong evidence for routine genetic screening in children with the disease. The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, revealed wide variation in screening, with some centres conducting routine genetic testing and others conducting none. […]
April 29, 2021

New research shows how immune response to TB differs in babies

The immune response to tuberculosis (TB) differs in adults and newborn babies due to the way immune cells use energy to kick into gear in a bid to kill the bacteria. This fresh discovery – just published in leading journal, Frontiers in Immunology – offers hope for improving treatments for what remains […]
April 29, 2021

TARGETING TUMORS WITH NANOWORMS

Drugs and vaccines circulate through our vascular system reacting according to their chemical and structural nature. In some cases, their destination is diffuse. In other cases, like cancer treatments, the intended target is highly localized. The effectiveness of a medicine —and how much is needed and the amount of side-effects […]
April 29, 2021

Researcher uses nanomedicine to improve effectiveness and safety of chemotherapy

A University of Alberta researcher is using nanotechnology to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments for cancer patients and reduce their side effects. Afsaneh Lavasanifar is a professor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences and an adjunct professor in the Department of Chemical and Medical Engineering. Her lab develops […]
April 29, 2021

Draining brain’s debris enhances Alzheimer’s therapies in mice

Experimental Alzheimer’s drugs have shown little success in slowing declines in memory and thinking, leaving scientists searching for explanations. But new research in mice has shown that some investigational Alzheimer’s therapies are more effective when paired with a treatment geared toward improving drainage of fluid — and debris — from […]
April 29, 2021

Stroke-recovery device using brain-computer interface receives FDA authorization

Innovative multidisciplinary research at Washington University led to development of 'breakthrough' device. A first-of-its-kind device that helps people disabled by stroke regain significant control over their arm and hand function by using their minds has received market authorization from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The IpsiHand Upper Extremity Rehabilitation […]