Related Science News – Page 48 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

April 3, 2021

Getting COVID-19 shot before a surgery actually makes a lot of sense

COVID-19 vaccine is what will pull us out of this pandemic. However, some people are not sure about the timing. If you are waiting for an elective surgery, should you get a vaccine shot before the procedure? Or should you wait and get the jab after the surgery? Scientists at […]
April 3, 2021

Scientists are looking for the best surgery to prevent blindness

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) increases intracranial pressure around the brain and causes blindness. Scientists are not sure what causes IIH, because the pressure builds up without the presence of tumour or disease. As the mechanism is unknown treatment for IIH is not yet developed. But now researchers at the University […]
April 2, 2021

Drinking cocoa can save your life? Scientists revealed unexpected benefits of the cosy beverage

Cocoa is delicious, warming and cosy, but it can also be healthy. Scientists at the University of Birmingham found that drinking cocoa can actually benefit you, despite its desert-like character. Researchers found that consumption of cocoa could protect people from mental stress-induced cardiovascular events – it might be life saving. […]
April 2, 2021

Breast cancer cells ‘steal’ nutrients from immune cells: study

Triple-negative breast cancer cells engage in a “glutamine steal” — outcompeting T cells for the nutrient glutamine and impairing their ability to kill tumor cells, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered. The team found that an inhibitor of glutamine transport selectively targeted tumor cells and enhanced the antitumor immune response, suggesting it […]
April 2, 2021

Case Study of Rare Nervous System Tumor Reveals Hypermutation

While deadly, gliosarcomas are a rare central nervous system tumor often overshadowed in research by more common tumors. These sarcomas can occur either in the brain or the spine (the latter is much less common). A team of Yale researchers saw an opportunity to expand on the limited knowledge available […]
April 2, 2021

Stopping Tooth Pain

Tooth pain has been notoriously difficult to study. But now, researchers at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital report in a study published in Science Advances that they have uncovered a new function for odontoblasts. These cells form dentin, the shell beneath the tooth’s enamel that encases the soft dental […]
April 2, 2021

Pancreatic Cancer Cells Hijack Muscle Protein to Beef Up Their Metabolism

Cancer starts with mutations in a cell’s DNA, but new UC San Francisco research shows that the endurance of a tumour relies on its ability to rapidly evolve and adapt to challenges brought about by the environment in which it grows. “A major obstacle cancer cells must overcome is their […]
April 2, 2021

Mice naturally engage in physical distancing, study finds

When someone is sick, it’s natural to want to stay as far from them as possible. It turns out this is also true for mice, according to an MIT study that also identified the brain circuit responsible for this distancing behaviour. In a study that explores how otherwise powerful instincts […]
April 2, 2021

Disrupted biochemical pathway in the brain linked to bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder affects millions of Americans, causing dramatic swings in mood and, in some people, additional effects such as memory problems. While bipolar disorder is linked to many genes, each one making small contributions to the disease, scientists don’t know just how those genes ultimately give rise to the disorder’s […]
April 2, 2021

How industrialized life remodels the microbiome

Thousands of different bacterial species live within the human gut. Most are beneficial, while others can be harmful. A new study from an MIT-led team has revealed that these bacterial populations can remake themselves within the lifetime of their host, bypassing genes back and forth. The researchers also showed that […]
April 1, 2021

Preventive treatment reduces diabetic retinopathy complications

In a clinical trial, early treatment with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections slowed diabetic retinopathy, a complication of diabetes that causes damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue in the retina. However, two years into the four-year study, the early treatment’s effect on vision – including changes […]
April 1, 2021

Chemo for glioblastoma may work better in morning than evening

An aggressive type of brain cancer, glioblastoma has no cure. Patients survive an average of 15 months after diagnosis, with fewer than 10% of patients surviving longer than five years. While researchers are investigating potential new therapies via ongoing clinical trials, a new study from Washington University in St. Louis […]
April 1, 2021

Developing a new platform for DNA sequencing

New research from the lab of Marija Drndić showcases a potential new platform for parallel DNA sequencing. Published in The Journal of Chemical Physics, the study uses state-of-the-art fabrication and analytical techniques and demonstrates a path to how solid-state materials can be further developed for high-throughput sequencing. The research was conducted by Drndić, PhD […]
April 1, 2021

Study: Stem Cell Transplants Prevent Relapses of Most Common Childhood Cancer

Children and young adults who receive CAR T-cell therapy for the most common childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, suffer remarkably fewer relapses and are far more likely to survive when the treatment is paired with a subsequent stem cell transplant, a new study finds. The research, with an average, follow […]
April 1, 2021

UO lab advances research on memory formation and recall

Difficulty remembering a password or where a car is parked outside a store doesn’t necessarily suggest memory problems. It’s likely that interference is clouding the brain, suggests University of Oregon neuroscientist Brice Kuhl. How do people encode new information and accurately recall it later? That’s the focus of the Kuhl […]
April 1, 2021

Sugar not so nice for your child’s brain development

Sugar practically screams from the shelves of your grocery store, especially those products marketed to kids. Children are the highest consumers of added sugar, even as high-sugar diets have been linked to health effects like obesity and heart disease and even impaired memory function. However, less is known about how […]
April 1, 2021

FDA approves first test of CRISPR to correct genetic defect causing sickle cell disease

In 2014, two years after her Nobel Prize-winning invention of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, Jennifer Doudna thought the technology was mature enough to tackle a cure for a devastating hereditary disorder, sickle cell disease, that afflicts millions of people around the world, most of them of African descent. Some 100,000 Black […]
March 31, 2021

COVID-19 increases allure of at-home colon cancer tests

A year ago, when the COVID-19 lockdown began, Dr. Rachel Issaka expected that colonoscopies would decline. She was surprised by how much. In the first two months, in-clinic colon cancer screenings fell by 90%.  “I was shocked,” said Issaka, a UW Medicine gastroenterologist and researcher with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. There […]
March 31, 2021

Cancer: a bitter disease that thrives in a bitter environment

When cancer invades the brain, normal salt levels are quickly thrown off-kilter, but detecting this change in patients has been difficult. A team of Yale researchers has developed a non-invasive way to observe these changes in close detail at the early stages of cancer growth. This method, developed in the […]
March 31, 2021

New research on vitamin D and respiratory infections important for risk groups

Earlier studies have shown that supplementary vitamin D seems to provide a certain degree of protection against respiratory infections. A new study involving researchers from Karolinska Institutet has now made the most comprehensive synthesis to date of this connection. The study, which is published in the journal Lancet Diabetes & […]
March 31, 2021

T cells recognize recent SARS-CoV-2 variants

When variants of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) emerged in late 2020, concern arose that they might elude protective immune responses generated by prior infection or vaccination, potentially making re-infection more likely or vaccination less effective. To investigate this possibility, researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious […]
March 31, 2021

Younger age of first cannabis use or prescription drug misuse is associated with faster development of substance use disorders

A new study shows that in the time after first trying cannabis or first misusing prescription drugs, the percentages of young people who develop the corresponding substance use disorder are higher among adolescents (ages 12-17) than young adults (ages 18-25). In addition, 30% of young adults develop a heroin use […]
March 31, 2021

Penn Medicine Researchers Reveal How a Cell Mixes its Mitochondria Before It Divides

In a landmark study, a team led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has discovered—and filmed—the molecular details of how a cell, just before it divides in two, shuffles important internal components called mitochondria to distribute them evenly to its two daughter cells. […]
March 31, 2021

Turning back the clock on a severe vision disorder

Gustavo Aguirre and William Beltran, veterinary ophthalmologists and vision scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, have studied a wide range of different retinal blinding disorders. But the one caused by mutations in the NPHP5 gene, leading to a form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), is one of the most severe. […]
March 31, 2021

UC Consortium Launches First Clinical Trial Using CRISPR to Correct Gene Defect That Causes Sickle Cell Disease

Scientists at UC San Francisco, UC Berkeley and UCLA have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patient’s own blood-forming stem cells. The trial will combine CRISPR […]
March 31, 2021

NeuroBasis, a new multi-institution project, is launched

As the ability of medicine to diagnose diseases expands, so does the need for science to decipher their causes. To that end, a team of neuroscientists at the Montreal Clinical Research Institute, affiliated with Université de Montréal, has launched a new project called NeuroBasis. It’s an $8M, a multi-institution collaboration […]
March 31, 2021

A new way to visualize mountains of biological data

Researchers led by the University of Missouri create a new method for analyzing large amounts of biological data to help scientists draw faster conclusions for possible treatments. Studying genetic material on a cellular level, such as single-cell RNA-sequencing, can provide scientists with a detailed, high-resolution view of biological processes at […]
March 31, 2021

Researchers craft AI-based tool that detects bipolar disorder at earlier stages

Many people with early-stage or first-episode bipolar disorder have cognitive deficits, such as issues with visual processing and spatial memory, but those deficits are often so subtle that the disorder can go undiagnosed for years. That could change thanks to researchers at the University of Alberta who have created a […]
March 31, 2021

Study Illuminates the Molecular Details of Lung Development

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have produced a detailed molecular atlas of lung development, which is expected to be a fundamental reference in future studies of mammalian biology and of new treatments for diseases, such as COVID-19, that affect the lungs. The researchers, […]
March 31, 2021

Study identifies potential biomarkers for cognitive struggles after surgery

But up to half of older patients undergoing surgery face a lesser-known but similarly formidable cognitive challenge: postoperative delirium, a condition triggered by a surgery that requires anaesthesia and whose trademarks are confusion, disturbed mental faculties, loss of orientation and anxiety. In the worst cases, postoperative delirium leads to extended […]