Related Science News – Page 25 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

January 2, 2020

Short or long sleep associated with Pulmonary Fibrosis

Scientists have discovered that people who regularly sleep for more than 11 hours or less than 4 hours are 2-3 times more likely to have the incurable disease, pulmonary fibrosis, compared to those that sleep for 7 hours in a day. They attribute this association to the body clock. The […]
January 2, 2020

Alzheimer ‘Tau’ Protein Far Surpasses Amyloid in Predicting Toll on Brain Tissue

Brain imaging of pathological tau-protein “tangles” reliably predict the location of future brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s patients a year or more in advance, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center. In contrast, the location of amyloid “plaques,” which have been the […]
December 31, 2019

Developmental changes in the brain may influence how often adolescents get drunk

A new study led by researchers at King’s College London has found that adolescents with particular patterns of brain development report an increased frequency in drunkenness. The research was published in JAMA Psychiatry. Using brain imaging data collected from 726 healthy adolescents, the researchers analysed changes in the volume of […]
December 31, 2019

Study finds potential link between cardiovascular death and some types of pesticides

A new study from the University of Iowa suggests that people who have higher levels of a chemical in their body that indicates exposure to commonly used insecticides die of cardiovascular disease at a significantly higher rate. Findings from the study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, suggest those who have […]
December 31, 2019

Vitamin D increases protection against infection, new model suggests

Oregon State University researchers have led the development of a new model for studying vitamin D’s role in infection prevention, and tests using the model suggest that vitamin D treatment can dramatically reduce the number of disease-causing bacteria in skin wounds. In addition to shedding light on infection-prevention potential, the […]
December 31, 2019

Persistent organic pollutants in maternal blood linked to smaller fetal size, NIH study suggests

Latest findings suggest that the chemicals, which are no longer produced in the United States but persist in the environment, may have lasting health effects even at low levels. Pregnant women exposed to persistent organic pollutants, or POPs, had slightly smaller fetuses than women who haven’t been exposed to these […]
December 31, 2019

Body Temperature May Provide Early Warning for Graft-Versus-Host Disease, a Study in Mice Suggests

Proof-of-concept research points to wearable monitors’ potential to offer low-cost, non-invasive way to detect this dangerous bone-marrow transplant complication. By continuously monitoring the body temperature of mice that had undergone bone-marrow transplants, researchers were able to detect early warning signs of graft-versus-host disease — a dangerous, sometimes deadly response of […]
December 30, 2019

Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar

A new study in rats suggests that caffeine may offset some of the negative effects of an obesogenic diet by reducing the storage of lipids in fat cells and limiting weight gain and the production of triglycerides. Rats that consumed the caffeine extracted from mate tea gained 16% less weight […]
December 30, 2019

Microbes are at work in our bodies, and researchers have figured out what they're up to

An algorithm akin to the annoyingly helpful one that attempts to auto-complete text messages and emails is now being harnessed for a better cause. NSF-funded researchers at Drexel University are using its pattern-recognition ability to identify microbial communities in the human body by sifting through volumes of genetic code. Their method could speed the […]
December 28, 2019

High risk for diabetes usually coincides with the high risk for heart disease, but not because of sugar

It is a frightening thing to hear that you are at a high risk for diabetes. However, doctors around the world have to say that every day to thousands of people. This diagnosis comes with a whole lot of other issues, such as a high risk for heart disease. But […]
December 27, 2019

Finally, machine learning interprets gene regulation clearly

In this age of “big data,” artificial intelligence (AI) has become a valuable ally for scientists. Machine learning algorithms, for instance, are helping biologists make sense of the dizzying number of molecular signals that control how genes function. But as new algorithms are developed to analyze even more data, they […]
December 27, 2019

Calcium channels play a key role in the development of diabetes

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have deciphered the diabetogenic role of a certain type of calcium channel in insulin-secreting beta cells. The researchers believe that blockade of these channels could be a potential new treatment strategy for diabetes. The study is published in the scientific journal PNAS. CaV3.1 channels […]
December 27, 2019

Clinical trials planned for brain tumor ‘GPS’ maps

A GPS map to guide neural navigation devices developed by a Case Western Reserve University cancer researcher has shown 90% accuracy in pinpointing brain tumors and will soon be tested in real-time with patients at Cleveland Clinic under a three-year, $600,000 V Foundation grant. The grant was awarded to Pallavi Tiwari, […]
December 27, 2019

Why isn’t there a vaccine for staph?

Staph bacteria, the leading cause of potentially dangerous skin infections, are most feared for the drug-resistant strains that have become a serious threat to public health. Attempts to develop a vaccine against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have failed to outsmart the superbug’s ubiquity and adaptability to antibiotics. Now, a study from Washington […]
December 27, 2019

A New Era is Dawning in Cystic Fibrosis Treatment

As her health began to worsen in late 2017, Annette Quinn started measuring her declining lung function by making note of the number of days between episodes of hemoptysis or coughing up blood. At first, the episodes occurred once every few months. But by the summer of 2018, Quinn experienced […]
December 27, 2019

Penn Researchers Predict 10-Year Breast Cancer Recurrence with MRI Scans

Diverse diseases like breast cancer can present challenges for clinicians, specifically on a cellular level. While one patient’s tumor may differ from another’s, the cells within the tumor of a single patient can also vary greatly. This can be problematic, considering that an examination of a tumor usually relies on a biopsy, which […]
December 27, 2019

Mindfulness video game changes areas of the brain associated with attention

With an estimated 97 percent of adolescents playing video games in their free time, there is growing potential to design games as tools for attention-building instead of attention-busting. A research team at the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the University of California, Irvine, designed a video game […]
December 27, 2019

Researchers Solve Protein Structure Associated with Inherited Retinal Diseases

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have reported the first structural model for a key enzyme, and its activating protein, that can play a role in some genetically inherited eye diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and night blindness. “There has been substantial research on the biochemical pathway involving this enzyme, […]
December 26, 2019

New method gives hope in understanding Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists are now able to label proteins in the brains of living mice who have a disease similar to Alzheimer’s disease, and have the labels remain in place. The tracer molecules have been developed at Linköping University. The new method allows the researchers to observe how harmful protein aggregates form […]
December 26, 2019

Sysmex Presents Academic Report with a View to Creating a Simple Method of Diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease Using Blood

Sysmex Corporation and Eisai Co., Ltd. are pursuing a joint project to develop a method of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease (AD) using blood, presented two posters showing the most recent data from the project. The presentations took place at the 12th Clinical Trials on Alzheimer's Disease (CTAD) conference, from December 4 […]
December 24, 2019

Motor neurone disease linked to cholesterol imbalance in cells

Scientists have developed a new theory on the underlying cause of motor neurone disease, which could lead to more accurate diagnosis for patients and new treatments. A team at the University of Exeter has found evidence that the condition is caused by an imbalance in cholesterol and other fat levels […]
December 24, 2019

For CRISPR, tweaking DNA fragments before inserting yields highest efficiency rates yet

University of Illinois researchers achieved the highest reported rates of inserting genes into human cells with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing system, a necessary step for harnessing CRISPR for clinical gene-therapy applications. By chemically tweaking the ends of the DNA to be inserted, the new technique is up to five times more […]
December 24, 2019

Measuring Mutations in Sperm May Reveal Risk for Autism in Future Children

Spontaneous mutations in paternal sperm are linked to autism spectrum disorder; researchers have developed way to quantify those mutations and assess chances the mutations will cause disease. The causes of autism spectrum disorder or ASD are not fully understood; researchers believe both genetics and environment play a role. In some […]
December 23, 2019

A step closer to understanding evolution―Mitochondrial division conserved across species

New study shows exactly how the manner in which mitochondria divide has remained the same since evolution began. A group of scientists at Tokyo University of Science showed for the first time that in red algae, an enzyme that is usually involved in cell division also plays a role in […]
December 23, 2019

Finding your way in the dark depends on your internal clock

How mammals perceive light changes between night and day. Researchers at Aalto University and the University of Helsinki discovered that mice were better at finding a dim light in pitch-darkness in experiments done at night time compared to ones done during the day time. The scientists were surprised to find […]
December 23, 2019

Detailed map of immune cells in human blood

Researchers at SciLifeLab report in the journal Science that they have created a detailed blood atlas of the proteins in human immune cells. The open-access database offers medical researchers an unprecedented resource in the search for treatments for diseases. The Blood Atlas resource is the latest database to be released […]
December 23, 2019

New Gene for Male Infertility Discovered

At least one in five cases of infertility remains unexplained. Malefactors contribute to about half of these cases and, much of the time, men lack a specific causal diagnosis for their infertility. Researchers estimate that genetics could explain up to 50 percent of these cases, but many of the genes […]
December 23, 2019

Light Reaction: improve the prevention and treatment of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy

A discovery by Harvard Medical School investigators at Massachusetts Eye and Ear provides new clues that may help improve the prevention and treatment of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), a genetic eye disease that causes vision loss. Researchers have, for the first time, showing a mechanism that advances understanding of […]
December 23, 2019

BCMA-Targeted Immunotherapy Can Lead to Durable Responses in Multiple Myeloma

Experimental, off-the-shelf immunotherapy that combines a targeted antibody and chemotherapy can lead to potentially durable responses in multiple myeloma patients whose disease has relapsed or is resistant to other standard therapies. A multi-center, international trial evaluated the drug, belantamab mafodotin, and found almost a third of patients whose disease had […]
December 23, 2019

Simple test can find rare cause of lower back pain

Medical experts from the University of Tokyo have identified simple test doctors can use to diagnose a rare condition that causes extreme back pain. Patients can receive a common imaging test, an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), twice: once while lying flat on their backs (supine) and once while lying face-down […]