Related Science News – Page 2 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

January 10, 2019

Discovery in cell development changes understanding of how genes shape early embryos

Our bodies hold roughly 14 trillion cells, each containing a nucleus with DNA measuring two meters long by 20 atoms wide. To fit inside each nucleus, DNA coils around specialized proteins. These spools of wrapped DNA inhibit gene regulatory proteins from binding to protein-coding stretches along the genome, which help […]
January 10, 2019

Two-Pronged Approach for Treating Recurrent Kidney Cancer

Pairing a novel personalized cancer vaccine with an established immunotherapy drug administered to patients in a new way, Harvard Medical School scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute are testing a first-of-its-kind strategy aimed at improving outcomes for kidney cancer patients who are at high risk of recurrence following surgery. This two-pronged approach to […]
January 10, 2019

The Best Diets for Cancer Patients and Cancer Survivors

Lifestyle changes often follow a cancer diagnosis, both during treatment and after. Eating well is often the first step. And there is good reason for it. A healthy diet can help prolong life for cancer patients and cancer survivors, says University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center member Suzanna Zick, N.D., MPH. Surveys show […]
January 10, 2019

New options for breast cancer drug development found in estrogen receptors

Many breast cancer drugs block estrogen receptors inside cancer cells. Blocking the receptors early in disease progression staves off metastasis. But most patients with advanced disease eventually develop drug resistance, leaving doctors desperate for alternatives. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Argonne National Laboratory and the Lawrence […]
January 10, 2019

Take These Four Actions to Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Cancer is a complex set of diseases that researchers are studying to improve therapy and develop prevention strategies. Although there is no single way to prevent cancer, oncologists agree that taking steps to mitigate risk is key. Experts at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James […]
January 10, 2019

Genomic Analysis Is Important Even for Ultra-Hypermutated Tumors Prior to Immune Therapy

New research from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James) underscores the importance of genomic analysis of rare malignant tumors that are genetically unstable and have high numbers of gene mutations. OSUCCC – James investigators […]
January 10, 2019

New insight into gene expression in all living things

A study published today in eLife, led by University of Wisconsin–Madison Professor of Biochemistry and Bacteriology Robert Landick and his research team, reveals for the first time the elemental mechanism behind transcriptional pausing, which underlies the control of gene expression in all living organisms. It also provides new understanding of the enzyme RNA polymerase, an […]
January 10, 2019

Stem cell study offers clues for optimizing bone marrow transplants and more

Bone marrow transplants, which involve transplanting healthy blood stem cells, offer the best treatment for many types of cancers, blood disorders and immune diseases. Even though 22,000 of these procedures are performed each year in the US, much remains to be understood about how they work. A new USC and […]
January 9, 2019

Food allergies more widespread in adults than previously suspected, new study finds

About 31 million U.S. adults have food allergies, nearly half of which develop after age 18, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open. The research, a collaboration between Stanford food allergy expert Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, and scientists at Northwestern University, is the first comprehensive examination of the prevalence of food allergies […]
January 9, 2019

A Diet High in Fat and Cholesterol Can Lead to Life-threatening Liver Disease

A new study by Keck School of Medicine of USC researchers shows there's yet another reason to avoid high fat, high cholesterol diet: It can trigger changes in the immune system that lead to a serious form of non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD) known as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NAFLD is […]
January 9, 2019

Women who start periods early are at greater risk of cardiovascular problems

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have conducted a study that has found young women who start having periods early and often have a high body mass index are more prone to cardiovascular problems later in life such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes. More than 800 young women […]
January 8, 2019

New insights into a rare type of cancer open novel avenues of study

Undifferentiated uterine sarcoma is a very rare but extremely aggressive cancer type. It can be divided into four groups with different characteristics of clinical importance – a new study at Karolinska Institutet reveals. The results, published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, also show that the survival rate of patients with […]
January 8, 2019

Elevated blood lead level in early childhood associated with increased risk of academic problems in school-aged children

Substantial numbers of Cleveland’s youngest students have had elevated levels of lead in their blood prior to kindergarten and these children have a higher risk of academic issues, according to two new studies by researchers at Case Western Reserve University. The first study, in coordination with Cuyahoga County’s Invest in […]
January 8, 2019

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it. With age, cells gradually lose their ability to take in and […]
January 8, 2019

Mice sleeping fitfully provide clues to insomnia

Mice that sleep fitfully could help researchers unravel the mystery of insomnia. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied mice genetically modified to mimic the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), which is associated with sleep problems. They found that the animals, like some people with […]
January 8, 2019

Racial differences in Alzheimer’s disease unveiled

African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop Alzheimer’s disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white pool of research participants. Consequently, little is known about how the neurodegenerative disease arises and progresses in people […]
January 8, 2019

Longevity primarily hereditary in extremely long-living families

Longevity is heritable, but that primarily applies to persons from families where multiple members are among the top 10 percent survivors of their birth cohort. The key to a long life can probably be found in the genes of these families. These are the conclusions of researchers at Leiden University […]
January 8, 2019

Hearing Loss Announced by Protein Boom in Blood

Blood levels of a special protein found only in the inner ear spike after exposure to loud noise, UConn Health researchers report. The findings point the way to blood tests that could warn people at risk of hearing loss before they suffer serious damage. Hearing loss can sneak up on […]
January 7, 2019

Bio-Inspired Material Interacts with Surrounding Tissue to Promote Healing

A research team from Imperial College London, led by Dr Ben Almquist, has developed a new molecule based on so-called traction force-activated payloads (TrAPs) which allow materials to talk to the body‘s natural repair systems and thereby activate healing processes. “Creatures from sea sponges to humans use cell movement to […]
January 7, 2019

A New Option to Rescue Knee Cartilage

New clinical trial is evaluating a next-generation approach to replacing damaged knee cartilage with healthy cartilage cultivated from a patient’s own cells. Cartilage, the slippery tissue on the ends of and between bones, provides cushioning and shock absorption. Specifically, in the knee, the articular cartilage at the end of the […]
January 7, 2019

Protein map using new method of analysis shared in open database

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab have developed a new method of analysis that maps the location of proteins in the cell. The information has been compiled in a database that is accessible to researchers around the world. The method of analysis, which has been published in the journal Molecular Cell, […]
January 7, 2019

Woman’s Rare Diagnosis Prompts Sweeping Treatment to Target Cysts

HIPEC, a procedure that combines surgery and heated chemotherapy, gave one patient peace of mind after hundreds of cysts were removed from her abdomen. Melissa Hough considers herself to be patient No. 154. That’s how unusual her condition is. In June, she was diagnosed with cystic mesothelioma. It’s a noncancerous […]
January 7, 2019

Bone Deep: "Atlas" of Osteoporosis Compiled

A new study by an international research team including Harvard Medical School faculty has compiled an “atlas” of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density, one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis. The paper, published online in Nature Genetics, identifies 518 genome-wide loci, including 301 newly discovered […]
January 7, 2019

Decoding the Newborn

As genomic sequencing becomes increasingly common in the clinic, questions linger about its use and role in newborn medicine. Can sequencing provide actual actionable insights? How common is it to find something important to a child’s future health? What are the benefits and other consequences of such findings for families? […]
January 7, 2019

Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure

A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. The study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed a survival benefit for moderate drinkers compared with those who […]
January 7, 2019

No egg is like another

Little more than fifty years after the German ornithologist Wolfgang Makatsch published his book entitled “No egg is like another” (Kein Ei gleicht dem anderen), new research at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and the University of Hohenheim reveals exactly […]
January 7, 2019

Gene map offers osteoporosis hope

An atlas of genetic markers may hold the key to unlocking new treatments for osteoporosis, thanks to University of Queensland researchers. The team identified more than 500 genetic markers which determine bone mineral density, one of the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis. Researchers hope the atlas will lead to the development of […]
January 4, 2019

Research reveals overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research from the University of Liverpool and Mars Petcare’s WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights. Results from the study, conducted retrospectively across two decades and published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, revealed the lifespan of […]
January 4, 2019

Sex differences identified in deadly brain tumors

For decades, scientists have recognized that more males get cancer and die of the disease than females. This is true for many types of cancer, including the deadly brain tumor glioblastoma. Now, a team of researchers led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified distinct molecular […]
January 4, 2019

Gut Immune Cells Cut Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers at the University of Toronto and UC San Francisco have discovered that the intestine is the source of immune cells that reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and that increasing the number of these cells blocks inflammation entirely in a preclinical model of the disease. The […]