Related Science News – Page 54 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

November 14, 2018

Community Choirs Reduce Loneliness and Increase Interest in Life for Older Adults

An innovative San Francisco program of community choirs for older adults found that singing in a choir reduced loneliness and increased interest in life, but did not improve cognition or physical function, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. The program – Community of Voices – was a collaboration […]
November 14, 2018

Alzheimer’s and Cardiovascular Disease Share Common Genetics in Some Patients

Genetics may predispose some people to both Alzheimer’s disease and high levels of blood lipids such as cholesterol, a common feature of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study by an international team of researchers led by scientists at UC San Francisco and Washington University School of Medicine in St. […]
November 13, 2018

Montreal Researchers Explain How Your Muscles Form

All vertebrates need muscles to function; they are the most abundant tissue in the human body and are integral to movement. In a recent article published in Nature Communications, an international team of researchers discovered two proteins essential to the development of skeletal muscle. This research, led by Jean-François Côté, a […]
November 13, 2018

Embryos remember the chemicals that they encounter

We all start out as a clump of identical cells. As these cells divide and multiply, they gradually take on distinct identities, acquiring the traits necessary to form, for instance, muscle tissue, bone, or nerves. A recent study from Rockefeller scientists offers new insight into how these cellular identities are […]
November 13, 2018

Link between autoimmune, heart disease explained in mice

People with autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis are at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease, even though none of these conditions seem to target the cardiovascular system directly. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis believe they have begun to understand the […]
November 13, 2018

Breast milk & babies’ saliva shape oral microbiome

Newborn breastfed babies’ saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies’ mouths, biomedical scientists have found. A study led by Dr Emma Sweeney and Adjunct Associate Professor Christine Knox, from QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, with colleagues at the […]
November 13, 2018

Scientists shine new light on link between obesity and cancer

Scientists have made a major discovery that shines a new, explanatory light on the link between obesity and cancer. Their research confirms why the body’s immune surveillance systems – led by cancer-fighting Natural Killer cells – stutter and fail in the presence of excess fat. Additionally, it outlines possible paths […]
November 13, 2018

Soy formula feeding during infancy associated with severe menstrual pain in adulthood

New research suggests that infant girls fed soy formula are more likely to develop severe menstrual pain as young adults. The finding adds to the growing body of literature that suggests exposure to soy formula during early life may have detrimental effects on the reproductive system. The study appears online […]
November 13, 2018

Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s genetically linked

Studying DNA from more than 1.5 million people, an international team of researchers — led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco — has identified points of DNA that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and also heighten the risk for […]
November 13, 2018

Selective amnesia: how rats and humans are able to actively forget distracting memories

Our ability to selectively forget distracting memories is shared with other mammals, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The discovery that rats and humans share a common active forgetting ability – and in similar brain regions – suggests that the capacity to forget plays a vital role in […]
November 13, 2018

New gene therapy reprograms brain glial cells into neurons

A new gene therapy can turn certain brain glial cells into functioning neurons, which in turn could help repair the brain after a stroke or during neurological disorders like Alzheimer's or Parkinson’s diseases. In a series of studies in animals, a team of Penn State researchers led by Gong Chen […]
November 12, 2018

Violence in childhood leads to accelerated aging, study finds

Children who suffer abuse are more likely to age faster, while those who endure food insecurity or neglect may develop more slowly, according to new research led by the University of Washington. Violence, psychological or emotional abuse, deprivation and neglect — adverse childhood experiences — can affect both epigenetic, or […]
November 12, 2018

Lifespan is continuing to increase regardless of socioeconomic factors, Stanford researchers find

Stanford biologist Shripad Tuljapurkar had assumed humans were approaching the limit to their longevity – that’s what previous research had suggested – but what he observed in 50 years of lifespan data was more optimistic than he was. Analyzing the average age of death in people who lived to be […]
November 12, 2018

Key molecule responsible for learning and memory discovered

Unlike old dogs, old adults can indeed learn new tricks thanks to a protein molecule called netrin. Netrin is known to help set up the healthy nervous system in an infant’s developing brain by directing brain cells to make appropriate connections with other brain cells. New research conducted by scientists […]
November 12, 2018

Breast cancer cells become invasive by changing their identity

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified a protein that determines the identity and invasive properties of breast cancer cells. The finding could lead to the development of new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies to target breast cancer invasion and metastasis. The study is published in the scientific journal Cancer Research. Cancer cell […]
November 12, 2018

Link between vaccines and allergies dismissed

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, having compared the development of allergies in children with and without the recommended vaccinations, find no support for the claim that childhood vaccination can increase the risk of allergy. The study is published in EClinicalMedicine, a new open access journal published by The Lancet. “Even though Sweden has […]
November 12, 2018

Women who are 'larks' have a lower risk of developing breast cancer

Women who are 'larks', functioning better at the beginning of the day than the end of the day, have a lower of risk breast cancer, according to new research led by the University of Bristol presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference. The study of several hundred thousand women, which […]
November 11, 2018

Small Tissue Chips in Space a Big Leap Forward for Research

A small device that contains human cells in a 3D matrix represents a giant leap in the ability of scientists to test how those cells respond to stresses, drugs and genetic changes. About the size of a thumb drive, the devices are known as tissue chips or organs on chips. […]
November 9, 2018

New immunotherapy technique can specifically target tumor cell

A new immunotherapy screening prototype developed by University of California, Irvine researchers can quickly create individualized cancer treatments that will allow physicians to effectively target tumors without the side effects of standard cancer drugs. UCI’s Weian Zhao and Nobel laureate David Baltimore with Caltech led the research team that developed […]
November 9, 2018

Genes behind rapid deer antler growth, hardening identified

Stanford scientists and their collaborators have identified two key genes responsible for the rapid growth of deer antlers. They hope their insights will open the door to new approaches for treating bone diseases and fractures. Each spring, male deer sprout a new pair of antlers, which are essentially temporary external […]
November 9, 2018

Tiny nanostraws to deliver molecules to human cells safely and efficiently

Researchers can design the perfect molecule to edit a gene, treat cancer or guide the development of a stem cell, but none of that will matter in the end if they can’t get their molecule into the human cells they want to manipulate. The solution to that problem, described in […]
November 9, 2018

Unique type of skeletal stem cells found in ‘resting zone’ are actually hard at work

Skeletal stem cells are valuable because it’s thought they can heal many types of bone injury, but they’re difficult to find because researchers don’t know exactly what they look like or where they live. Researchers at the University of Michigan have identified a type of skeletal stem cell in the […]
November 9, 2018

New Options and New Hope in Lung Cancer Treatment

Lung cancer is among the most frequently occurring forms of cancer, second only to prostate cancer in men and breast cancer in women. It’s also the most lethal cancer type, claiming the lives of more adults than colon, breast and prostate cancer combined. About 8 in 10 lung cancer cases […]
November 9, 2018

Survival rates for ovarian cancer patients could be increased by this little scope

Ovarian cancer claims the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic cancers – as high as 70 percent – in part because the disease is rarely detected earlier than stage 3 or 4. When the disease is discovered early in its development, however, survival rates are high. An effective screening technique […]
November 8, 2018

Why does it take humans so long to mature compared to other animals? Look to your neurons!

New Vanderbilt research finds how long humans and other warm-blooded animals live—and when they reach sexual maturity—may have more to do with their brain than their body. More specifically, it is not animals with larger bodies or slower metabolic rates that live longer; it is animals with more neurons in […]
November 7, 2018

Predicting Risk of Major Coronary Events

Physicians can assess the risks of major coronary events in someone with diabetes reasonably well. Among those with diabetes, there are well-established indicators of risk such as weight, fasting levels of blood glucose and family history of the disease. Doctors also can consider more general measures of health such as […]
November 7, 2018

Gut bacteria may control movement

A new study puts a fresh spin on what it means to “go with your gut.” The findings, published in Nature, suggest that gut bacteria may control movement in fruit flies and identify the neurons involved in this response. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders […]
November 7, 2018

Breast milk, formula nurture similarities, differences in gut microbes

Infant formula is designed to mimic human breast milk not only in nutrients but also by nurturing a similar set of microbes in the digestive tract. Such microbes are indispensable in keeping us healthy: They crowd out disease-causing bacteria, influence our metabolism, and synthesize many vitamins and amino acids, the […]
November 7, 2018

New Platform Based on Biology and Nanotechnology Carries mRNA Directly to Target Cells

Delivering an effective therapeutic payload to specific target cells with few adverse effects is considered by many to be the holy grail of medical research. A new Tel Aviv University study explores a biological approach to directing nanocarriers loaded with protein “game changers” to specific cells. The groundbreaking method may prove useful […]
November 7, 2018

Neonatal Birthweights Increase in Direct Proportion to Number of Births

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that neonatal birthweights increase in direct proportion with the number of births of the mother in at least 30 percent of all cases. The study focuses on the risk of having large for gestational age (LGA) infants, babies who clock in at higher than the […]