Related Science News – Page 21 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

March 22, 2019

Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug

Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have developed a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them. The synthesis of cephalotaxine and homoharringtonine (HHT) paves the way toward less-expensive, more readily available leukemia drugs whose production is not subject […]
March 22, 2019

Scientists narrow in on cells that drive immune response to cancer

Immunotherapy, using the body’s own immune system to target and destroy cancer cells, is one of the most promising frontiers in cancer research, but many patients do not respond to the therapies for reasons not fully understood. Scientists at the Yale Systems Biology Institute have taken a step closer to understanding how […]
March 22, 2019

Restoring hearing loss

A team of worldwide researchers including engineers from the University of Utah have received a $9.7-million grant to design and develop a new implantable device and surgical procedure for the deaf that hopefully will cut through the noise and produce much more detailed sound than traditional hearing-loss treatments. This new […]
March 21, 2019

Space technology can help patients take a "giant leap" around their neighborhood

“Space pants” are part of a clinical trial researching heat therapy as a treatment option for peripheral artery disease. The countdown and final checklist review happen every morning for Stephen Scott. He gets up in the early morning hours to make his coffee. He turns on the TV. He channels […]
March 21, 2019

Engineering Researcher Explains why Time Seems to Fly as we get Older

“Why does it feel that the time passes faster as we get older? What is the physical basis for the impression that some days are slower than others? Why do we tend to focus on the unusual (the surprise), not on the ever present?,” asks Adrian Bejan, the J.A. Jones […]
March 21, 2019

‘Selfish’ genetics amplify inflammation, age-related diseases

Aging affects every living organism, but the molecular processes that contribute to aging remain a subject of debate. While many things contribute to the aging process, one common theme in animal aging is inflammation—and this may be amplified by a class of selfish genetic elements. The human genome is littered […]
March 21, 2019

To Predict Which Cancer Cells Will Attack the Brain, Scientists Harness the Power of Artificial Intelligence

Not all cancer cells are created equal. Only a small number of cells in a patient’s initial tumor may have the power to travel through the blood, cross the protective membrane known as the blood-brain barrier, and directly attack the brain. But which cells? What makes them special? How can […]
March 21, 2019

Protective antibodies also found in premature babies

Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, they say. Antibodies are transferred from the mother’s blood […]
March 21, 2019

Experimental blood test accurately spots fibromyalgia

For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples – work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis. In a study that appears in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers from The Ohio State University report success in identifying biomarkers of […]
March 21, 2019

Green tea cuts obesity, health risks in mice

Green tea cut obesity and a number of inflammatory biomarkers linked with poor health in a new study. Mice fed a diet of 2 percent green tea extract fared far better than those that ate a diet without it, a finding that has prompted an upcoming study of green tea’s […]
March 20, 2019

Mutations in noncoding genes could play big role in regulating cancer, study finds

RNA transcribed from genes that seem not to code for anything may play an important role in regulating cancer, a new study suggests. A number of these noncoding RNA fragments lie next to known cancer genes, the study found. Understanding how they interact with those cancer genes could open new […]
March 20, 2019

Potential new cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing or defective in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University […]
March 20, 2019

Study: Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer

Scientists at the University of Illinois have found that free fatty acids in the blood appear to boost proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells. The finding could help explain obese women’s elevated risk of developing breast cancer after menopause. “When taken up by estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer cells, these […]
March 20, 2019

Narcolepsy may be caused by the body attacking itself

Researchers from DTU and the University of Copenhagen are now pointing out that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease. This may be important to future treatment of this chronic disorder. Between 2,500 and 3,000 Danes suffer from the sleep disorder narcolepsy—which is characterized by a sudden and overwhelming urge to sleep. […]
March 20, 2019

UW team finds key to common cancer pathway in discovery that could unlock new therapies

Scientists have long known that the protein p53, when mutated, is a critical factor in the onset of many different kinds of cancer. In its unmutated form, however, it is known to protect against cancer. These dueling qualities make the p53 protein and the gene that makes it among the […]
March 20, 2019

Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life’s first steps

Scientists puzzled for two decades over this seemingly unnecessary withholding. Now researchers at Princeton University have shown that the inhibiting mechanism, controlled by an enzyme known as RNR, is key to the embryo’s survival. Too much material early on leads to disaster for the fledgling lifeform. “This study shows us […]
March 20, 2019

Grow a better jawbone in your ribs

The jawbone is not typically connected to the rib bone, but it might be in an emergency. Rice University bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a technique to grow live bone to repair craniofacial injuries by attaching a 3D-printed bioreactor — basically, a mold — to a rib. Stem cells and blood vessels from […]
March 20, 2019

With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight

It was surprisingly simple. University of California, Berkeley, scientists inserted a gene for a green-light receptor into the eyes of blind mice and, a month later, they were navigating around obstacles as easily as mice with no vision problems. They were able to see motion, brightness changes over a thousandfold […]
March 20, 2019

Light physical activity linked to lower risk of heart disease in older women

Light physical activity such as gardening, strolling through a park, and folding clothes might be enough to significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among women 63 and older, a new study has found. This kind of activity, researchers said, appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease events such […]
March 19, 2019

Researchers from Cambridge Grow a ‘Mini-Brain’ Capable of Contracting Muscle

A group of researchers from the University of Cambridge have grown a miniature (roughly pea-sized) brain in a dish which they claim might “improve our understanding of human brain development and neurological disorders”. The paper accompanying the work, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, details how a grey blob of […]
March 19, 2019

Surgery no better than medication at preventing serious complications of atrial fibrillation

Catheter ablation, a common cardiovascular procedure, appears no more effective than drug therapies in preventing strokes, deaths, and other complications in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, patients who get the procedure experience much greater symptom relief and long-term improvements in the quality of life, including  fewer recurrences of the condition […]
March 19, 2019

Colorectal Cancer Screening Might Need to Start Sooner Than You Thought

Thinking you could wait till your 50th birthday to worry about colorectal cancer? Maybe not. New guidelines from the American Cancer Society recognize recent studies that have found increasing rates of colorectal cancer among younger people. In response, they lowered the recommended age to begin screening from 50 to 45. “Research […]
March 19, 2019

Chronic Short Sleep Associated With Adolescent Obesity

Older children and teenagers may have a higher risk of obesity if they consistently don’t get enough sleep, according to recent Michigan Medicine research. The study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, found the highest levels of obesity in adolescents who weren’t sleeping enough night after night, even more so than […]
March 19, 2019

Researchers find the immune system's unknown messenger

Researchers can now explain how a cell that is being attacked by bacteria or viruses specifically manages to ‘sound the alarm’ among its neighbouring cells so they can react with a quick response. “We’ve succeeded in finding and describing a messenger which both quickly and effectively can inform the surrounding […]
March 19, 2019

Chromatin changes rapidly in response to low oxygen, study finds

Research by Professor Sonia Rocha and her team at the Institute of Integrative Biology reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation. Published in the prestigious journal Science, the researchers found that chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins where all genes reside, quickly changes in response to low oxygen. Oxygen is essential for […]
March 19, 2019

A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target

One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block the Myc protein, but so far their efforts have not been successful. Now, using an alternative strategy, MIT researchers have […]
March 19, 2019

Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer’s symptoms

By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer’s patients. This noninvasive treatment, which works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations, also greatly reduced the number of amyloid […]
March 18, 2019

Preclinical Data Shows Combination Immunotherapy Could Stop Liver Cancer Growth

Even as overall cancer incidence and mortality decrease in the United States, the number of people diagnosed with liver cancer is on the rise. Current therapies for liver cancer are largely ineffective, resulting in poor outcomes, but new preclinical data from University of California San Diego School of Medicine offers […]
March 18, 2019

UC San Diego Study Points to Virus-Related Acceleration in Some Cancers

While the human T- cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is known to cause a rare cancer of the immune system’s T-cells called adult T-cell leukemia or ATL in about five percent of those infected, researchers from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and Moores Cancer Center at UC San […]
March 18, 2019

Study recommends new ways to treat musculoskeletal pain

A new study led by The University of Western Australia has identified 11 recommendations to help health professionals and patients better manage musculoskeletal problems. The study comes after the team found many musculoskeletal problems were not being managed effectively. Musculoskeletal conditions – including back and neck pain, osteoarthritis and shoulder […]