Related Science News – Page 21 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

February 7, 2020

Gene ID’d as potential therapeutic target for dementia in Parkinson’s

Dementia is one of the most debilitating consequences of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition characterized by tremors, stiffness, slow movement and impaired balance. Eighty percent of people with Parkinson’s develop dementia within 20 years of the diagnosis, and patients who carry a particular variant of the gene APOE are at especially […]
February 7, 2020

Collaboration lets researchers ‘read’ proteins for new properties

Clumps of proteins inside cells are a common thread in many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease. These clumps, or solid aggregates of proteins, appear to be the result of an abnormality in the process known as liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), in which individual proteins […]
February 7, 2020

Why weight training may be the best exercise for everyone

From avoiding lower back pain to burning more calories and improving memory, weightlifting offers wide-ranging benefits for body and mind, say U of A experts. While research shows little or no link between exercise and any meaningful long-term weight loss, that doesn’t mean exercising, particularly resistance training, doesn’t provide a […]
February 7, 2020

‘Chemical earmuffs’ could prevent hearing loss

Biologists identify hearing-loss receptor in mice, use drug to prevent hearing damage. Once you start to lose your hearing, you can’t get it back. But what if you could prevent hearing loss by blocking in advance the effects of loud noises? That’s a route a team of biologists at the University […]
February 7, 2020

Brain Tumor Surgery that Pushes Boundaries Boosts Patients Survival

Survival may more than double for adults with glioblastoma, the most common and deadly type of brain tumor, if neurosurgeons remove the surrounding tissue as aggressively as they remove the cancerous core of the tumor. This discovery, reported in a retrospective study headed by researchers at UC San Francisco, is […]
February 7, 2020

Molecular ‘switch’ reverses chronic inflammation and aging

Chronic inflammation, which results when old age, stress or environmental toxins keep the body’s immune system in overdrive, can contribute to a variety of devastating diseases, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s to diabetes and cancer. Now, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified a molecular “switch” that controls the […]
February 7, 2020

Researchers Find Synchronization of Memory Cells Critical For Learning and Forming Memories

The phrase “Pavlov’s dogs” has long evoked images of bells, food and salivating dogs. Even though this tried-and-true model of repetitive patterns mimics a variety of learning processes, what happens on a cellular level in the brain isn’t clear. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took a closer look […]
February 7, 2020

iPS cells to regulate immune rejection upon transplantation

Scientists suggest a new strategy that uses induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to regulate immune reaction to transplanted tissues. The team, led by Professor Ken-ichiro Seino of Hokkaido University’s Institute for Genetic Medicine, found that thymic epithelium cells derived from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can regulate immune response […]
February 7, 2020

Cold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanoma

The patch significantly prolonged survival, inhibited growth of tumors in mice. An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has developed a medicated patch that can deliver immune checkpoint inhibitors and cold plasma directly to tumors to help boost the immune response and kill cancer cells. […]
February 6, 2020

Redrawing the map of cancer genome research

Cancer’s genetic causes are more diverse than previous scientific studies have indicated – a conclusion reached by researchers from ETH Zurich and University Hospital Zurich. Through their participation in an international research collaboration, they helped compile the most comprehensive catalogue to date of gene alterations associated with cancer. Their work […]
February 6, 2020

Half of Lupus Rashes Harbor High Levels of Bacteria Responsible for Infections

A new study finds that one side effect of lupus could also make patients with the autoimmune condition more vulnerable to a skin infection, or spreading the infection to others. In the paper, published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, researchers found that 50% of skin rashes in patients with lupus contained an […]
February 6, 2020

Adding Up

A merger of math and medicine may help to improve the efficacy of immunotherapies, potentially life-saving treatments that enhance the ability of the patient’s own immune system to attack cancerous tumors. By creating mathematical models that represent the complex interactions within the tumor microenvironment (TME), the nonmutated cells, connective tissues […]
February 6, 2020

Researchers discover new cancer-causing mutations in genes’ control switches

Using sophisticated algorithms to explore regions of the genome whose roles in cancer have been largely uncharted, an international team of researchers has opened the door to a new understanding of the disease’s genetic origins. The discovery involves areas of DNA that do not directly code for the proteins that […]
February 6, 2020

Speeding Up Treatments for ALS

Therapeutic solutions for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease) could be on the horizon thanks to unexpected findings by University of Arizona researchers. Disease-prompting bundles of proteins found within cells are cleared by unexpected processes. ALS is the progressive degeneration of motor neurons that causes people to lose […]
February 5, 2020

Chromatin organizes into 3D 'forests' in single cells

A single cell contains the genetic instructions for an entire organism. This genomic information is managed and processed by the complex machinery of chromatin — a mix of DNA and protein in chromosomes whose function and role in disease are of increasing interest to scientists and engineers. Using mathematical modeling […]
February 5, 2020

Researchers to investigate method of growing new blood vessels

A new treatment for stimulating the growth of new blood vessels in the heart will be investigated by researchers at the University of Bristol thanks to the funding of over £100,000 from national charity Heart Research UK. A heart attack is caused by a blockage of one or more coronary […]
February 5, 2020

Ultrasound Can Selectively Kill Cancer Cells

A new technique could offer a targeted approach to fighting cancer: low-intensity pulses of ultrasound have been shown to selectively kill cancer cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. Ultrasound waves—sound waves with frequencies higher than humans can hear—have been used as a cancer treatment before, albeit in a broad-brush approach: […]
February 5, 2020

Microbes linked to cancer in threatened California foxes, report Princeton researchers

Can staph microbes lead to cancer? Microbes are known to affect digestion, mood and overall health, and now Princeton researchers have shown that a shift in the microbiome is linked to cancer — at least in a threatened subspecies of foxes found only on one island off the California coast. Their […]
February 5, 2020

Studies suggest new path for reversing type-2 diabetes and liver fibrosis

In a pair of related studies, a team of Yale researchers has found a way to reverse type-2 diabetes and liver fibrosis in mice, and has shown that the underlying processes are conserved in humans. The studies appear in the edition of Cell Reports and Nature Communications. In the earlier […]
February 4, 2020

Flickering Light Mobilizes Brain Chemistry That May Fight Alzheimer’s

For over a century, Alzheimer’s disease has confounded all attempts to treat it. But in recent years, perplexing experiments using flickering light have shown promise. Now, researchers have tapped into how the flicker may work. They discovered in the lab that the exposure to light pulsing at 40 hertz – […]
February 4, 2020

Tumbleweeds or fibrils: Tau proteins need to choose

New simulations by Rice University scientists tell a tale of two taus and how they relate to neurological disease. Their work suggests tau proteins take either of two paths to form aggregates suspected of promoting, and perhaps causing, Alzheimer’s and Pick’s (aka frontotemporal dementia) diseases. Precisely why remains a mystery, but figuring it out offers the […]
February 3, 2020

Loss of Lung Function Correlates with Epigenetic Age Acceleration

Epigenetic clocks are a topic of considerable interest in the research community. They are perhaps the most promising of the present techniques for assessing biological age, the closest to becoming a useful biomarker of aging. Epigenetic clocks are weighted algorithmic combinations of the DNA methylation status of various sites on the genome, reflecting changes that […]
February 3, 2020

Assessing ‘Stickiness’ of Tumor Cells Could Improve Cancer Prognosis

A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has created a device that measures how “sticky” cancer cells are, which could improve prognostic evaluation of patient tumors. The device is built with a microfluidic chamber that sorts cells by their physical ability to adhere to their […]
February 3, 2020

Penn Researchers Identify Cancer Cell Defect Driving Resistance to CAR T Cell Therapy

Some cancer cells refuse to die, even in the face of powerful cellular immunotherapies like CAR T cell therapy, and new research from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania is shedding light on why. In a new study, researchers describe how a death receptor pathway in the cancer cell […]
February 3, 2020

Diving Deep: Insights into Skeletal Features of Fish

From fragile ice fish deep in the Antarctic Ocean to flying fish gliding above the Caribbean Sea, fish have evolved a fascinating variety of skeletal traits. These traits not only help them adapt to their environments, but they also provide genetic insights into rare human skeletal disorders. Fish are not […]
February 3, 2020

Novel insight into chromosome 21 and its effect on Down syndrome

Scientists have identified specific regions of chromosome 21 which cause problems in memory and decision-making in mice with Down’s syndrome. They say it is the first time the areas have been determined – and suggest the findings may provide new insight into the condition in humans. Most people have 46 […]
February 3, 2020

Get easily out of breath? It may be because you were small at birth, study finds

Babies born with low birth weights are more likely to have poor cardiorespiratory fitness later in life than their normal-weight peers. That is according to a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAHA. The findings underscore the importance of prevention strategies to reduce low […]
January 31, 2020

New View of the Brink of Cancer May Validate Preventive Mastectomy

Women who have prophylactic mastectomies to stay ahead of a BRCA2 mutation may have made a wise choice, according to findings of a study just published in Science Advances. I’m amazed at the bravery of these women who go the Angelina Jolie route. Inheriting a BRCA2 mutation brings a 50 to 80 percent lifetime risk of developing […]
January 31, 2020

Double trouble: A drug for alcoholism can also treat cancer by targeting macrophages

The deadly nature of cancer stems from its ability to spread and grow inside the host. Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are host macrophages recruited by the tumor, which promote tumor progression. A team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science and other institutes have discovered that the protein FROUNT may […]
January 31, 2020

McGill researchers lay foundation for next generation aortic grafts

A new study by researchers at McGill University has measured the dynamic physical properties of the human aorta, laying the foundation for the development of grafts capable of mimicking the native behavior of the human body’s largest artery. Marco Amabili, a Canada Research Chair professor in McGill’s Department of Mechanical […]