Related Science News – Page 17 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

January 31, 2020

Protein research seeks to induce tumor regression

MYC is a family of three related proteins that are overexpressed in cancer and which contribute to an estimated 100,000 cancer deaths annually in the United States. Efforts to block MYC directly have failed. Fortunately, these proteins have an Achilles’ heel — a chromosome-binding cofactor called WDR5. Understanding how MYC […]
January 30, 2020

Brain networks come ‘online’ during adolescence to prepare teenagers for adult life

New brain networks come ‘online’ during adolescence, allowing teenagers to develop more complex adult social skills, but potentially putting them at increased risk of mental illness, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Adolescence is a time of major change in life, with […]
January 30, 2020

Stem Cells, CRISPR and Gene Sequencing Technology are Basis of New Brain Cancer Model

Using genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers created a new type of cancer model to study in vivo how glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, develops and changes over time. “We have developed stem cell models that are CRISPR-engineered […]
January 30, 2020

New Injection Technique May Boost Spinal Cord Injury Repair Efforts

Writing in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine, an international research team, led by physician-scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, describe a new method for delivering neural precursor cells (NSCs) to spinal cord injuries in rats, reducing the risk of further injury and boosting the propagation of […]
January 30, 2020

Lab-Grown Cardiac Muscles Successfully Transplanted into a Human for the First Time in History

On Monday, 27 January 2020, researchers from Osaka University in Japan have announced the first-ever successful physician-initiated clinical trial whereby heart muscles grown using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have been transplanted into a human patient. Induced pluripotent stem cells – derived from the blood cells of healthy adult donors […]
January 30, 2020

Hacking Menopause

AARP Innovation Labs is looking for the world's best developers who are passionate about finding ways to enhance the quality of life for women before, during, and after menopause. AARP iLabs seeks a science-based approach to wellness and assistive technology, including AI, electronics, software, industrial design, and psychology to enable prime […]
January 30, 2020

Discovery Could Help Slow Down Progression of Parkinson’s Disease

A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and Scripps Research led to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s, which affects 1 million people in the United States and over 10 million worldwide according to the Parkinson’s Foundation, is a neurodegenerative […]
January 30, 2020

Not ‘Brains in a Dish’: Cerebral Organoids Flunk Comparison to Developing Nervous System

Widely Used Brain Organoids are ‘Confused’ and ‘Disorganized’ Compared to New Atlas of the Developing Human Brain. Brain organoids – 3-D balls of brain-like tissue grown in the lab, often from human stem cells – have been touted for their potential to let scientists study the formation of the brain’s […]
January 30, 2020

Cheap nanoparticles stimulate immune response to cancer in the lab

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed nanoparticles that, in the lab, can activate immune responses to cancer cells. If they are shown to work as well in the body as they do in the lab, the nanoparticles might provide an effective and more affordable way to fight cancer. They are […]
January 29, 2020

An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease

The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine. A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences found the answer by analyzing data from three large, […]
January 29, 2020

Senolytic Treatment Fails to Reverse Uterine Fibrosis in Mice

Senolytic drugs that selectively destroy senescent cells in aged tissues have performed quite well in animal studies of fibrosis in heart, lung, and kidney. The therapy reverses fibrosis in those tissues to a larger degree, and with greater reliably, than is the case for any other readily available approaches. Unfortunately small molecule senolytics are all tissue specific to varying degrees […]
January 29, 2020

Researchers bid to slow down heart failure

A new research project funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) at the University of Manchester aims to find a way to slow down the progression of heart failure. Heart failure is a life-threatening condition that affects 920,000 people in the UK. For people with severe heart failure, everyday tasks […]
January 29, 2020

AI-analyzed blood test can predict the progression of neurodegenerative disease

Evaluating the effectiveness of therapies for neurodegenerative diseases is often difficult because each patient’s progression is different. A new study shows artificial intelligence (AI) analysis of blood samples can predict and explain disease progression, which could one day help doctors choose more appropriate and effective treatments for patients. Scientists at […]
January 29, 2020

Penn Nanoparticles are Less Toxic to T Cells Engineered for Cancer Immunotherapy

New cancer immunotherapies involve extracting a patient’s T cells and genetically engineering them so they will recognize and attack tumors. This technique is a true medical breakthrough, with an increasing number of leukemia and lymphoma patients experiencing complete remissions since CAR T therapy was FDA approved in 2017. This type […]
January 29, 2020

Scientists short-circuit maturity in insects, opening new paths to disease prevention

New research from UC Riverside shows scientists may soon be able to prevent disease-spreading mosquitoes from maturing. Using the same gene-altering techniques, they may also be able help boost reproduction in beneficial bumblebees. The research shows that, contrary to previous scientific belief, a hormone required for sexual maturity in insects […]
January 29, 2020

AI and 3D Bioprinting Successes for Mesothelioma Patients

Healthcare has had major upgrades since implementing Artificial Intelligence (AI) to facilitate the responsibilities of doctors, technicians, nurses, and other medical employees. This technology is constantly being advanced to reach ultimate standards in efforts to aid and improve medicine as we know it. Within the past year, the completion and […]
January 28, 2020

Shortness of breath and cough increase as first symptom of lung cancer

GPs are being urged to consider shortness of breath and cough as potential predictors of lung cancer, after a study found they were becoming more common as the first symptom in diagnosis. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the UK and has a poor five year […]
January 28, 2020

Missing Protein in Brain Causes Behaviors Mirroring Autism

Scientists at Rutgers University-Newark have discovered that when a key protein needed to generate new brain cells during prenatal and early childhood development is missing, part of the brain goes haywire – causing an imbalance in its circuitry that can lead to long-term cognitive and movement behaviors characteristic of autism […]
January 28, 2020

Calorie Restriction and Calorie Restriction Mimetics Dampen Inflammation

Chronic inflammation is an important aspect of aging, a process that stems from low-level biochemical damage and cellular dysfunction, and that then contributes to the progression of age-related disease and tissue dysfunction. Chronic inflammation sustained over years accelerates all of the common fatal age-related conditions: it disrupts tissue maintenance, and […]
January 27, 2020

Give & take: Cancer chromosomes give the game away

As tumours develop, cancer cells gain and lose so-called “chromosome arms”, changing their response to drugs, a finding which may offer better personalised treatments for 17 types of cancer. Dr Pascal Duijf from QUT’s School of Biomedical Sciences and IHBI (Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation) said the study, published […]
January 27, 2020

Liver Fibrosis ‘Off Switch’ Discovered in Mice

Chronic alcohol abuse and hepatitis can injure the liver, often leading to a buildup of collagen and scar tissue. Understanding this process, known as liver fibrosis, could help researchers develop new ways to prevent or treat conditions such as alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and nonalcoholic flatty liver disease […]
January 27, 2020

Opioid Dependence Found to Permanently Change Brains of Rats

Approximately one-quarter of patients who are prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them, with five to 10 percent developing an opioid use disorder or addiction. In a new study, published 2020 in PNAS, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that opioid dependence produced permanent changes […]
January 27, 2020

Researchers uncover the genomics of health

Most diseases have a genetic component. To better understand disease, researchers led by the Garvan Institute of Medical Research are analysing genetic information to determine what keeps us healthy. In a world first, the team has compiled a genome reference database of thousands of healthy older Australians, which has the […]
January 27, 2020

Can lithium halt progression of Alzheimer’s disease?

There remains a controversy in scientific circles today regarding the value of lithium therapy in treating Alzheimer’s disease. Much of this stems from the fact that because the information gathered to date has been obtained using a multitude of differential approaches, conditions, formulations, timing and dosages of treatment, results are […]
January 27, 2020

A single number helps Stanford data scientists find most dangerous cancer cells

Biomedical data scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown that the number of genes a cell uses to make RNA is a reliable indicator of how developed the cell is, a finding that could make it easier to target cancer-causing genes. Cells that initiate cancer are thought to be […]
January 27, 2020

High-protein diets boost artery-clogging plaque, mouse study shows

High-protein diets may help people lose weight and build muscle, but a new study in mice suggests they have a downside: They lead to more plaque in the arteries. Further, the new research shows that high-protein diets spur unstable plaque — the kind most prone to rupturing and causing blocked […]
January 27, 2020

Benefits of fetal surgery to repair spina bifida persist through school age

Children as young as 6 years old who underwent fetal surgery to repair a common birth defect of the spine are more likely to walk independently and have fewer follow-up surgeries, compared to those who had traditional corrective surgery after birth, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of […]
January 27, 2020

Discovery sheds new light on how cells move

When we cut our skin, groups of cells rush en masse to the site to heal the wound. But the complicated mechanics of this collective cell movement — which are facilitated by rearrangements between each cell and its neighbors — have made it challenging for researchers to decipher what’s actually […]
January 27, 2020

Low-dose aspirin may reduce preterm birth risk among first-time mothers

Daily low-dose aspirin, from as early as the sixth week of pregnancy through the 36th week, may lower the risk for preterm birth among first-time mothers, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The clinical trial, which involved more than 11,000 women in several low- and middle-income […]
January 27, 2020

Why eating yoghurt may help lessen the risk of breast cancer

One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria say, researchers. Scientists say their idea- as yet unproven – is supported by the available evidence, which is that bacterial-induced inflammation is linked to cancer. The paper in the journal Medical Hypotheses is by Lancaster University medical […]