Related Science News – Page 11 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

March 26, 2019

A Protein’s Surprising Role Offers Clues to Limit Graft-vs.-Host Disease

A protein that protects people with inflammatory bowel disease has quite a different effect in graft-vs.-host disease, a common and challenging side effect of bone marrow transplants. In a surprising finding, researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center showed the protein NLRP6 aggravated the difficult symptoms of gastrointestinal graft-vs.-host disease […]
March 26, 2019

New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, […]
March 26, 2019

Sniffing out Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to progressive brain cell death and extensive loss of motor function. Despite much research being conducted on this disease, there are no definitive diagnostic tests currently available. Now, researchers report the identification of compounds that make up the signature odor of the […]
March 26, 2019

How Colon and Rectal Cancer Differ

The terms “colon cancer” and “colorectal cancer” tend to be used interchangeably. But there are important differences between colon and rectal cancers. Less common and potentially more dangerous, rectal cancer calls for special expertise to properly diagnose and treat it. Karin Hardiman, M.D., Ph.D., surgical director of the Rogel Cancer Center’s Multidisciplinary […]
March 25, 2019

NIH study finds no evidence that calcium increases risk of AMD

Eating a calcium-rich diet or taking calcium supplements does not appear to increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to the findings of a study by scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI). AMD is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness among people age 65 and […]
March 25, 2019

Remembrance of Things Past

In research that casts cells as curators of their own history, Harvard Medical School researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have discovered that adult tissues retain a memory, inscribed on their DNA, of the embryonic cells from which they arose. The discovery led to one even more intriguing find—that the memory […]
March 25, 2019

Scientists uncover mysteries of the powerful movement of the human sperm

Sperm is an incredibly good swimmer for its size. It needs quite a bit of strength to break through the cervical mucus barrier. But where does that strength come from? Scientists from the universities of York and Oxford say that the secret is the outer-layer which coats the tails of […]
March 25, 2019

Preserving Fertility in Pediatric Cancer Survivors

One in three childhood cancer survivors is at risk of becoming infertile due to chemotherapy or radiation, and since their sperm or eggs have not matured, assisted reproduction using those sperm or eggs is not an option when they become adults. Now in a major first, researchers at the University of […]
March 25, 2019

Antibodies stabilise plaque in arteries

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have found that type IgG antibodies play an unexpected role in atherosclerosis. A study on mice shows that the antibodies stabilise the plaque that accumulates on the artery walls, which reduces the risk of it rupturing and causing a blood clot. It is hoped that the results, […]
March 25, 2019

Perivascular spaces linked to worse cognition

Enlarged perivascular spaces, which are commonly seen on brain MRIs in older adults, have important associations with worse cognitive performance, particularly information processing speed and executive function, according to a new study that challenges historical consideration that perivascular spaces are a harmless imaging marker. Enlarged perivascular spaces are fluid-filled spaces […]
March 25, 2019

Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests. Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically “male” – mounting other female rodents, for instance – and had brains and nervous systems […]
March 24, 2019

Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme—protein kinase A or PKA—will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. Kinases are a large group of hundreds of […]
March 22, 2019

Eisai's Initiation of Phase III Clinical Trial of BAN2401 in Early Alzheimer's Disease

Eisai Co., Ltd. announced that a global Phase III clinical study (Clarity AD/Study 301) of BAN2401, an anti-amyloid beta protofibril antibody, in patients with early Alzheimer's disease has been initiated. BAN2401 is being jointly developed by Eisai and Biogen Inc. Clarity AD is a global placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, randomized study […]
March 22, 2019

'Tremendous Contributions' for Developmental Biology

Professor Otger Campàs receives 2019 Elizabeth D. Hay New Investigator Award from the Society for Developmental Biology. How do we develop from a mass of undifferentiated cells into organisms of tissues and organs with specific three-dimensional morphologies and architectures? That question has been one of the perennial mysteries at the […]
March 22, 2019

Gene Therapy Shows Initial Promise for Parkinson’s Disease

A delicate operation that involved placing a gene into the brain was found to reduce the severity of motor symptoms in patients with moderately advanced Parkinson’s disease, whose symptoms were no longer controlled by their medications. In a phase I gene therapy trial led by UC San Francisco, 15 patients […]
March 22, 2019

Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug

Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have developed a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them. The synthesis of cephalotaxine and homoharringtonine (HHT) paves the way toward less-expensive, more readily available leukemia drugs whose production is not subject […]
March 22, 2019

Scientists narrow in on cells that drive immune response to cancer

Immunotherapy, using the body’s own immune system to target and destroy cancer cells, is one of the most promising frontiers in cancer research, but many patients do not respond to the therapies for reasons not fully understood. Scientists at the Yale Systems Biology Institute have taken a step closer to understanding how […]
March 22, 2019

Restoring hearing loss

A team of worldwide researchers including engineers from the University of Utah have received a $9.7-million grant to design and develop a new implantable device and surgical procedure for the deaf that hopefully will cut through the noise and produce much more detailed sound than traditional hearing-loss treatments. This new […]
March 21, 2019

Space technology can help patients take a "giant leap" around their neighborhood

“Space pants” are part of a clinical trial researching heat therapy as a treatment option for peripheral artery disease. The countdown and final checklist review happen every morning for Stephen Scott. He gets up in the early morning hours to make his coffee. He turns on the TV. He channels […]
March 21, 2019

Engineering Researcher Explains why Time Seems to Fly as we get Older

“Why does it feel that the time passes faster as we get older? What is the physical basis for the impression that some days are slower than others? Why do we tend to focus on the unusual (the surprise), not on the ever present?,” asks Adrian Bejan, the J.A. Jones […]
March 21, 2019

‘Selfish’ genetics amplify inflammation, age-related diseases

Aging affects every living organism, but the molecular processes that contribute to aging remain a subject of debate. While many things contribute to the aging process, one common theme in animal aging is inflammation—and this may be amplified by a class of selfish genetic elements. The human genome is littered […]
March 21, 2019

To Predict Which Cancer Cells Will Attack the Brain, Scientists Harness the Power of Artificial Intelligence

Not all cancer cells are created equal. Only a small number of cells in a patient’s initial tumor may have the power to travel through the blood, cross the protective membrane known as the blood-brain barrier, and directly attack the brain. But which cells? What makes them special? How can […]
March 21, 2019

Protective antibodies also found in premature babies

Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, they say. Antibodies are transferred from the mother’s blood […]
March 21, 2019

Experimental blood test accurately spots fibromyalgia

For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples – work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis. In a study that appears in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers from The Ohio State University report success in identifying biomarkers of […]
March 21, 2019

Green tea cuts obesity, health risks in mice

Green tea cut obesity and a number of inflammatory biomarkers linked with poor health in a new study. Mice fed a diet of 2 percent green tea extract fared far better than those that ate a diet without it, a finding that has prompted an upcoming study of green tea’s […]
March 20, 2019

Mutations in noncoding genes could play big role in regulating cancer, study finds

RNA transcribed from genes that seem not to code for anything may play an important role in regulating cancer, a new study suggests. A number of these noncoding RNA fragments lie next to known cancer genes, the study found. Understanding how they interact with those cancer genes could open new […]
March 20, 2019

Potential new cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing or defective in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University […]
March 20, 2019

Study: Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer

Scientists at the University of Illinois have found that free fatty acids in the blood appear to boost proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells. The finding could help explain obese women’s elevated risk of developing breast cancer after menopause. “When taken up by estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer cells, these […]
March 20, 2019

Narcolepsy may be caused by the body attacking itself

Researchers from DTU and the University of Copenhagen are now pointing out that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease. This may be important to future treatment of this chronic disorder. Between 2,500 and 3,000 Danes suffer from the sleep disorder narcolepsy—which is characterized by a sudden and overwhelming urge to sleep. […]
March 20, 2019

UW team finds key to common cancer pathway in discovery that could unlock new therapies

Scientists have long known that the protein p53, when mutated, is a critical factor in the onset of many different kinds of cancer. In its unmutated form, however, it is known to protect against cancer. These dueling qualities make the p53 protein and the gene that makes it among the […]