Related Science News – Page 11 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

January 8, 2019

Elevated blood lead level in early childhood associated with increased risk of academic problems in school-aged children

Substantial numbers of Cleveland’s youngest students have had elevated levels of lead in their blood prior to kindergarten and these children have a higher risk of academic issues, according to two new studies by researchers at Case Western Reserve University. The first study, in coordination with Cuyahoga County’s Invest in […]
January 8, 2019

Scientists identify new fuel-delivery route for cells

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown route for cellular fuel delivery, a finding that could shed light on the process of aging and the chronic diseases that often accompany it. With age, cells gradually lose their ability to take in and […]
January 8, 2019

Mice sleeping fitfully provide clues to insomnia

Mice that sleep fitfully could help researchers unravel the mystery of insomnia. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis studied mice genetically modified to mimic the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), which is associated with sleep problems. They found that the animals, like some people with […]
January 8, 2019

Racial differences in Alzheimer’s disease unveiled

African-Americans may be twice as likely as Caucasian Americans to develop Alzheimer’s disease, but nobody knows why because studies investigating the underlying causes of illness have historically drawn from a nearly all-white pool of research participants. Consequently, little is known about how the neurodegenerative disease arises and progresses in people […]
January 8, 2019

Longevity primarily hereditary in extremely long-living families

Longevity is heritable, but that primarily applies to persons from families where multiple members are among the top 10 percent survivors of their birth cohort. The key to a long life can probably be found in the genes of these families. These are the conclusions of researchers at Leiden University […]
January 8, 2019

Hearing Loss Announced by Protein Boom in Blood

Blood levels of a special protein found only in the inner ear spike after exposure to loud noise, UConn Health researchers report. The findings point the way to blood tests that could warn people at risk of hearing loss before they suffer serious damage. Hearing loss can sneak up on […]
January 7, 2019

Bio-Inspired Material Interacts with Surrounding Tissue to Promote Healing

A research team from Imperial College London, led by Dr Ben Almquist, has developed a new molecule based on so-called traction force-activated payloads (TrAPs) which allow materials to talk to the body‘s natural repair systems and thereby activate healing processes. “Creatures from sea sponges to humans use cell movement to […]
January 7, 2019

A New Option to Rescue Knee Cartilage

New clinical trial is evaluating a next-generation approach to replacing damaged knee cartilage with healthy cartilage cultivated from a patient’s own cells. Cartilage, the slippery tissue on the ends of and between bones, provides cushioning and shock absorption. Specifically, in the knee, the articular cartilage at the end of the […]
January 7, 2019

Protein map using new method of analysis shared in open database

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab have developed a new method of analysis that maps the location of proteins in the cell. The information has been compiled in a database that is accessible to researchers around the world. The method of analysis, which has been published in the journal Molecular Cell, […]
January 7, 2019

Woman’s Rare Diagnosis Prompts Sweeping Treatment to Target Cysts

HIPEC, a procedure that combines surgery and heated chemotherapy, gave one patient peace of mind after hundreds of cysts were removed from her abdomen. Melissa Hough considers herself to be patient No. 154. That’s how unusual her condition is. In June, she was diagnosed with cystic mesothelioma. It’s a noncancerous […]
January 7, 2019

Bone Deep: "Atlas" of Osteoporosis Compiled

A new study by an international research team including Harvard Medical School faculty has compiled an “atlas” of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density, one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis. The paper, published online in Nature Genetics, identifies 518 genome-wide loci, including 301 newly discovered […]
January 7, 2019

Decoding the Newborn

As genomic sequencing becomes increasingly common in the clinic, questions linger about its use and role in newborn medicine. Can sequencing provide actual actionable insights? How common is it to find something important to a child’s future health? What are the benefits and other consequences of such findings for families? […]
January 7, 2019

Moderate drinking not harmful for older patients with heart failure

A new study suggests that people over age 65 who are newly diagnosed with heart failure can continue to drink moderate amounts of alcohol without worsening their condition. The study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, showed a survival benefit for moderate drinkers compared with those who […]
January 7, 2019

No egg is like another

Little more than fifty years after the German ornithologist Wolfgang Makatsch published his book entitled “No egg is like another” (Kein Ei gleicht dem anderen), new research at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry and the University of Hohenheim reveals exactly […]
January 7, 2019

Gene map offers osteoporosis hope

An atlas of genetic markers may hold the key to unlocking new treatments for osteoporosis, thanks to University of Queensland researchers. The team identified more than 500 genetic markers which determine bone mineral density, one of the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis. Researchers hope the atlas will lead to the development of […]
January 4, 2019

Research reveals overweight dogs may live shorter lives

New research from the University of Liverpool and Mars Petcare’s WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition reveals overweight dogs are more likely to have shorter lives than those at ideal body weights. Results from the study, conducted retrospectively across two decades and published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, revealed the lifespan of […]
January 4, 2019

Sex differences identified in deadly brain tumors

For decades, scientists have recognized that more males get cancer and die of the disease than females. This is true for many types of cancer, including the deadly brain tumor glioblastoma. Now, a team of researchers led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified distinct molecular […]
January 4, 2019

Gut Immune Cells Cut Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

Researchers at the University of Toronto and UC San Francisco have discovered that the intestine is the source of immune cells that reduce brain inflammation in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and that increasing the number of these cells blocks inflammation entirely in a preclinical model of the disease. The […]
January 4, 2019

The number of people living with dementia in the world doubled since 1990

Age-related dementia is a terrible debilitating condition, which affects millions around the globe. It is one of the reasons why so many of us are afraid of getting old. Scientists say that dementia is actually a growing problem – the global burden of dementia has doubled since 1990, according to […]
January 4, 2019

Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion

A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, an Oregon State University researcher says. That’s important news for the estimated 35 percent of the U.S. adult population that suffers from the syndrome. “What […]
January 4, 2019

Cancer cells steer a jagged path

A jagged little protein appears to be key to how cancer stem cells differentiate and enable metastasis, according to researchers at Rice University and the Duke University School of Medicine. Rice scientists who have formed several theories on how cancer grows and spreads connected the dots for a more complete […]
January 4, 2019

Scientists are looking for a way to cut off melanoma's escape routes

Melanoma is an extremely dangerous cancer, which spreads quickly and is relatively hard to treat. One of the more effective strategies would be to stop cancer from spreading, making its presence a bit more local and, therefore, easier to treat. But how do you achieve that? Scientists from the University […]
January 4, 2019

An Errant Editing Enzyme Promotes Tumor Suppressor Loss and Leukemia Propagation

Writing in the journal Cancer Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that detection of “copy editing” by a stem cell enzyme called ADAR1, which is active in more than 20 tumor types, may provide a kind of molecular radar for early detection of malignancies and […]
January 4, 2019

Cutting off melanoma’s escape routes

Stopping melanoma from spreading to other parts of the body might be as simple as cutting off the blood supply to the cancer, according to researchers. Scientists from The University of Queensland’sDiamantina Institute have discovered stem cells which form blood vessels in tumours, and have identified how to ‘switch the cells off’. […]
January 3, 2019

Researchers take a Step Closer to Successfully Treating Alzheimer‘s with New Designer Molecules

As amyloid beta peptides bind to prion proteins, a cascade of events, which include the accumulation of plaques, abnormal immune responses and damage to synapses, is triggered, eventually leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Fortunately, researchers have been working hard on a variety of treatment avenues. In one of […]
January 3, 2019

Swim, Jump, Shoot, Lift: Paralympians reveal brain’s amazing ability to adapt

Professor Kimitaka Nakazawa built a career studying neurological rehabilitation after spinal cord injury. He had long been interested in sports physiology and when he moved to the University of Tokyo in 2009, he had the academic freedom to add studies of dancers and baseball pitchers to his research. It wasn't […]
January 3, 2019

Artificial Intelligence Can Detect Alzheimer’s Disease in Brain Scans Six Years Before a Diagnosis

Using a common type of brain scan, researchers programmed a machine-learning algorithm to diagnose early-stage Alzheimer’s disease about six years before a clinical diagnosis is made – potentially giving doctors a chance to intervene with treatment. No cure exists for Alzheimer’s disease, but promising drugs have emerged in recent years […]
January 3, 2019

New compound shows promise in treatment of Alzheimer’s

Yale researchers have identified a drinkable cocktail of designer molecules that interferes with a crucial first step of Alzheimer’s and even restores memories in mice, they report n the journal Cell Reports. The binding of amyloid beta peptides to prion proteins triggers a cascade of devasting events in the progression of […]
January 3, 2019

Tiny, implantable device uses light to treat bladder problems

A team of neuroscientists and engineers has developed a tiny, implantable device that has potential to help people with bladder problems bypass the need for medication or electronic stimulators. The team — from Northwestern University, Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign — developed a […]
January 3, 2019

Sandia microneedles technique may mean quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw — usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle — might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, […]