Related Science News – Page 34 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

October 8, 2018

Immune cells help older muscles heal like new

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have found a critical component for growing self-healing muscle tissues from adult muscle—the immune system. The discovery in mice is expected to play an important role in studying degenerative muscle diseases and enhancing the survival of engineered tissue grafts in future cell therapy applications. The […]
October 8, 2018

Portable cancer test uses smartphone, new gold biosensor

Early diagnosis of cancer greatly improves the odds of successful treatment. Yet many people, especially in developing countries, lack access to facilities to detect the disease. To address this issue, a University at Buffalo-led research team is creating a new cancer-spotting tool that health care providers could eventually use in […]
October 8, 2018

Discovering a single cell that leads to relapse

New research from the Abramson Cancer Center identified a rare cause for relapse in leukemia: a single leukemic cell engineered for CAR T therapy and infused back into the patient. The findings, published in Nature Medicine, showed that the CAR lentivirus that usually enters a T cell to teach it to hunt cancer […]
October 8, 2018

Old drug could have new use helping sick premature babies

Researchers from The University of Western Australia, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Curtin University are investigating whether an old drug could be used to help very sick premature babies. In a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology the researchers examine the use of a drug called pentoxifylline in pre-term […]
October 5, 2018

Young cancer survivors struggle to imagine their life in the future

Surviving cancer is a huge achievement and a relief. It opens up a future of possibilities, it changes your perspective to life and can be motivating. However, many people find themselves disoriented and confused after undergoing a successful cancer treatment. In fact, scientists from the University of New South Wales […]
October 5, 2018

Molecular guardians monitor chromosomes during cell division

One of the worst things that can happen to a cell is to end up with the wrong number of chromosomes. This can happen if something goes wrong during cell division, and it can lead to infertility, miscarriages, birth defects, or cancer. An estimated 30 percent of miscarriages are due […]
October 5, 2018

Tales from 141,430 and one genomes

Analysis of the world’s largest set of genome data from pregnant women, totaling 141,431 expectant mothers from across China, has uncovered unsuspected associations between genes and birth outcomes, including the birth of twins and a woman’s age at first pregnancy. The analysis also allowed researchers to reconstruct the recent movement […]
October 4, 2018

One more year of high school may shape waistlines later in life

What a difference a year of high school can make — for long-term health. In 1972, England, Scotland and Wales raised the mandatory school attendance age from 15 to 16. Through a large-scale genetic study, USC Dornsife researchers have found that decades later, the change had a health benefit for […]
October 4, 2018

Scientists develop mouse ‘embryo-like structures’ with organisation along body’s major axes

A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has developed an artificial mouse embryo-like structure capable of forming the three major axes of the body. The technique, reported today in the journal Nature, could reduce the use of mammalian embryos in research. The definitive architecture of the mammalian body is […]
October 4, 2018

Livesaving Facts About Aortic Dissection

Aortic dissection occurs when weakened layers of the aorta — the body’s main artery — pull apart or tear, trapping blood between layers. This further weakens the aorta and may cause it to rupture. “An acute aortic dissection is a very lethal condition,” says Bo Yang, M.D., a cardiac surgeon at the University […]
October 4, 2018

Older Adults Have High Interest in Genetic Testing — and Some Reservations

Only a fraction of people in their 50s and early 60s have had their DNA tested —either for medical reasons, to learn their ancestry or out of curiosity — but far more have an interest in pursuing such tests. One in 10 older adults have taken genetic tests offered directly to consumers, and […]
October 4, 2018

Ovarian Cancer Survivor: Early Detection, Attitude Are Crucial

Robin Kingsbury spends the bulk of her time helping others. So when a swollen lymph node in her right groin began hurting in January 2017, it was hard to slow down and take notice. With a blended family of five kids plus elderly in-laws to take care of, the busy […]
October 3, 2018

Breastfeeding changes gene activity that may make babies less reactive to stress

It has long been known that there are many physical and mental health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. But can these benefits be due to genetic changes induced by breastfeeding? New research suggests that connection. The research, published in the edition of Pediatrics, was led by Barry M. Lester, Ph.D, […]
October 3, 2018

Disease causing mutation found in French-Canadians

A team of Canadian scientists, including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) has discovered the first French-Canadian founder mutation gene linked to synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases that includes Parkinson’s disease (PD), dementia with Lewy-Bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). The mutation, known as […]
October 3, 2018

A daily dose of aspirin doesn't help older people to stay healthy

An apple a day keeps the doctor away. That is how that old saying goes, but some people substitute apple with a pill of aspirin. This quite strange yet very common behaviour was encouraged by doctors and older people alike. It is believed that taking a low daily dose of […]
October 3, 2018

DNA vaccine leads to immune responses in HPV-related head and neck cancer

Researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center tested a new immunotherapy approach utilizing a therapeutic vaccine in two groups of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa), and found 86 percent showed elevated T cell activity. It is the first study to show that the vaccine can help immune cells infiltrate tumors. HNSCCa […]
October 3, 2018

Therapy applied directly inside the eye best for treating uveitic macular edema

Delivery of corticosteroids directly into the eye is more effective than injections adjacent to the eye, according to results from a comparative clinical trial of macular edema in patients with noninfectious uveitis. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. The […]
October 3, 2018

The XL Factor

Sometimes our cells employ meticulous and elegant solutions to fix things that break. Other times, they slap on some duct tape and keep going. The human body can apply these quick-and-dirty methods to even its most critical components, such as when both strands of a DNA helix suddenly snap. Such […]
October 3, 2018

Breast milk helps pre-term babies catch up in brain development

Some babies act like they are in a rush. They come to this world too quickly and have to deal with some health problems because of it. Scientists know this issue, which is why they are looking for ways to aid the brain development of pre-term babies. However, nature already […]
October 3, 2018

Middle-age drinkers don't consider alcohol when thinking about their health

Pretty much everyone knows that drinking has severe negative health effects – that is not a surprise to anyone. However, some people are still abusing alcohol, while completely ignoring all the warning signs. A new study from the University of Adelaide found that middle-age drinkers who only consume a moderate […]
October 2, 2018

Mitochondrial mechanisms focus of study

Mysteries remain in your mitochondria, but researchers led by Rice University bioscientist Natasha Kirienko plan to bring them to light. Kirienko is the first Rice faculty member to win a new class of grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, one of the National Institutes of Health, called an R35. The five-year grant […]
October 2, 2018

Cell Death Protein also Damps Inflammation

Inflammation is one strategy your body uses to fight infection, but if it gets out of control it can kill instead of heal. In the journal Immunity, UConn Health immunologist Vijay Rathinam and colleagues show how the body damps down inflammation, making clever double use of a protein previously thought to be responsible […]
October 2, 2018

Egg cell seeks sperm

Through clever partner selection, animals can increase the future success of their offspring. With some species, this process continues even after the sex act. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plön have discovered that among sticklebacks, the egg cells of the fish are involved in the […]
October 2, 2018

Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases

Mitochondrial disease is now thought to be the second most commonly diagnosed genetic disease worldwide, and, unfortunately, there are still no proven treatment strategies for those diagnosed. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne were involved in collaborations to apply gene-therapy approaches in mice to […]
October 1, 2018

Fecal microbiota transplantation helps restore beneficial bacteria in cancer patients

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have shown that autologous fecal microbiota transplantation (auto-FMT) is a safe and effective way to help replenish beneficial gut bacteria in cancer patients who require intense antibiotics during allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In their study, patients who underwent the procedure were randomly […]
October 1, 2018

Genetic Predictors of Lifespan Studied in Whites and Asians Don’t Apply to Black Youth

Protective caps at the ends of our chromosomes called telomeres protect our cells’ genomic information but shorten each time a cell divides. This shortening of telomeres has been linked to aging and chronic diseases. For example, previous studies have shown that individuals with asthma have shorter telomeres than those without […]
October 1, 2018

Chiropractic Treatment and Vision Loss: Examining the Connection

Many Americans visit chiropractors to address pain, often without informing their physicians. And they might not consider eye complications that could result, says Yannis Paulus, M.D., a retina specialist at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. The energetic thrusts and rotations sometimes performed in high-velocity neck manipulation have been shown to create […]
September 29, 2018

People with dementia need support when hanging up the keys

We as human want to be mobile. We want to move around, see things and meet people. And a car is a great way to do that. However, once you reach a certain age you really shouldn‘t be driving. But that is such a difficult change. Scientists from the University […]
September 28, 2018

Team research reveals how cells 'eat and sleep' may impact several cancer types

From aging to cancer — with quite a bit in between — Katherine Aird, assistant professor of cellular and molecular physiology at Penn State College of Medicine, and her team have a whole world of research opportunities in front of them. This is not just because they have a lot […]
September 28, 2018

Could aspirin play role in treatment of cancer?

The systematic review, which looked at the survival of 120,000 patients with cancer who took aspirin, compared with 400,000 patients who did not, showed that at any time following the diagnosis of some cancers the proportion of patients who were still alive was 20-30% greater in those taking the drug.  The […]