Related Science News – Page 22 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

September 6, 2019

New hair follicles can corral skin cancer

The same genetic mutations that can trigger cancer in some tissues are relatively harmless in others. A new Yale study has identified an unlikely source of protection against some forms of skin cancer — hair follicle regeneration. The regeneration of hair follicles protects against tumor growth even in the presence […]
September 5, 2019

Fertility-sparing surgery is as good as radical surgery for early ovarian cancer

Young women with early stage ovarian cancer can undergo fertility-preserving surgery without affecting the safety of their cancer treatment, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a national study published in the journal Gynecologic Oncology. Non-epithelial ovarian cancer (NEOC) is an unusual form of cancer most commonly diagnosed in […]
September 5, 2019

Killing cancer cells with nanoparticles

Another collaborative project from a nanoparticles expert at The University of Texas at Arlington has yielded promising results in the search for more effective, targeted cancer treatments. Wei Chen, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Rhode Island and Brown University, recently published a new paper in the Proceedings […]
September 5, 2019

NIH, Cincinnati Children’s scientists develop potential strategy against leukemia drug resistance

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center have devised a potential treatment against a common type of leukemia that could have implications for many other types of cancer. The new approach takes aim at a way that cancer cells evade the effects of drugs, […]
September 5, 2019

Overweight and obesity levels dipping in Alberta preschoolers, but severe obesity unchanged

The number of overweight and obese preschool-aged children is on the decline in Alberta, but severe obesity remains virtually unchanged, according to a new study. Researchers examined data from more than 160,000 Alberta children between the ages of four and six from 2010 to 2017. They found the prevalence of […]
September 5, 2019

Cracking “virus code” could help fight cancer

Ad26 is a virus of great interest to the scientific and medical community. Ad26 is both a human pathogen causing severe respiratory distress, and potentially death in vulnerable patients, and a key component in new vaccines to fight deadly diseases. An Ad26 based vaccine is currently being deployed in Africa […]
September 5, 2019

Mood of children during earliest stages of life linked to maternal mental health

Researchers and clinicians have long understood that depression and other mood disorders in mothers can have substantial, detrimental effects on the mental health of children in their care. In fact, maternal depression is now recognized as one of the most important risk factors in the cognitive and socioemotional development of […]
September 5, 2019

Soldiers, athletes could have improved outcomes from traumatic brain injury through faster diagnosis using urine analysis

Scientists also report that even a mild hit or blast to the brain can benefit from early detection, treatment. WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – A traumatic brain injury is often easily suspected and can be confirmed and treated if necessary following an injury using a blood analysis, but scientists are reporting […]
September 4, 2019

Discovered a molecule that regulates the development of cancer in a variety of human tumors

Sonia Guil, leader of the Regulatory and Chromatin RNA group of Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, and Lourdes Farré of ProCURE (Idibell) have discovered an intermediate molecule expressed from a region of the non-coding genome that is key to the development and differentiation of cells, and for the expansion of […]
September 4, 2019

Why transporters really matter for cell factories

Scientists discover the secret behind some protein transporters’ superiority. One transporter, MAE1, can export organic acids out of yeast spending close-to-zero energy. Organic acids are utilized as building blocks for plastic and rubber, and the finding could become important in industrial biotech. In a new study published in PNAS, scientists […]
September 4, 2019

Onset mechanism of schizophrenia is different between males and females, new study shows

Schizophrenia affects more than 21 million people worldwide. It is a mental disorder, characterized by a decreased ability to understand reality. People with this condition suffer from unclear or confused thinking, hearing voices, violent thoughts and other symptoms. Men are affected more often than women, which is why scientists set […]
September 4, 2019

Liver Transplant Candidates with Public Insurance Have Worse Waitlist Outcomes Than Those with Private Insurance

Patients with similar liver cancer characteristics on the waitlist for a liver transplant had significantly worse outcomes with public insurance compared to Kaiser Permanente or other private insurance, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. Their findings appeared online in JAMA Network Open. “Public insurance should be […]
September 4, 2019

Parkinson's disease may originate in the intestines

In 2003, a German neuropathologist proposed that Parkinson’s disease, which attacks the brain, actually might originate from the gut of the patients. Researchers from Aarhus have now delivered decisive supportive evidence after seeing the disease migrate from the gut to the brain and heart of laboratory rats. The scientific journal Acta […]
September 4, 2019

Blocking Specific Protein Could Provide a New Treatment for Deadly Form of Prostate Cancer

Blocking a kinase known as CDK7 sets off a chain reaction that results in the death of prostate cancer cells that have spread and are resistant to standard therapies, according to a new study from researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. The team identified the role […]
September 4, 2019

NIH launches novel nationwide search for neuroprotective stroke therapies

Recently the National Institutes of Health called on researchers to make the standards and practices for conducting early stage, or preclinical, medical research on animals more like those used for clinical trials. To facilitate this change, NIH will fund a nationwide preclinical trial platform designed to systematically and efficiently test […]
September 4, 2019

Poor diet can lead to blindness

An extreme case of “fussy” or “picky” eating caused a young patient’s blindness, according to a new case report published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The University of Bristol researchers who examined the case recommend clinicians consider nutritional optic neuropathy in any patients with unexplained vision symptoms and poor diet, […]
September 4, 2019

Mumps study shows immunity gaps among vaccinated people

Immunity against mumps virus appears insufficient in a fraction of college-aged people who were vaccinated in childhood, research from Emory Vaccine Center and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicates. The findings highlight the need to better understand the immune response to mumps and mumps vaccines. The results of […]
September 4, 2019

Enzyme Known for Promoting Cancer Also Protects Healthy Cells

New research from the University of Maryland and the National Institutes of Health reveals a new role for the enzyme telomerase. Telomerase’s only known role in normal tissue was to protect certain cells that divide regularly, such as embryonic cells, sperm cells, adult stem cells and immune cells. Scientists thought […]
September 2, 2019

Menopausal hormone therapy increases breast cancer risk for years

An international collaboration, using data from more than 100,000 women with breast cancer from 58 epidemiological studies worldwide, has found that using menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and that some increased risk persists for more than a decade after use stops. The […]
September 2, 2019

Cell-free DNA detects pathogens and quantifies damage

A common problem in diagnosing infectious disease is that the presence of a potential pathogen in the body does not necessarily mean the patient is sick. This can be particularly challenging for the treatment of organ transplant recipients, who often grapple with infection as well as complications related to immunosuppression. […]
September 2, 2019

Preserved Heart Failure Trial Misses Endpoint, But Drug May Benefit Some Patients

The number of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is on the rise, and the search is on for a therapy that can improve health outcomes in this group of patients for whom no approved therapies are available. In a Hot Line Session at the European Society of […]
September 2, 2019

Choosing chicken over red meat could reduce the risk of breast cancer

Eating red meat, especially in large quantities, is not good for you. In fact, eating a lot of red meat has been associated with heart disease and cancer. Meanwhile chicken, according to this new international study, might actually reduce the risk of breast cancer. We say “might” because, regardless what […]
September 2, 2019

A fruitful endeavor: Researcher examines berry polyphenols as potential treatment for cardiovascular treatment

A Florida State University researcher is examining how the polyphenol compounds found in blackberries could be used to help fight the buildup of artery plaque. Gloria Salazar, associate professor of nutrition, has received $805,409 from the James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program at the Florida Department of Health to […]
August 30, 2019

Low cost mobile technology shifts the dial on cardiovascular risk in rural Indonesia

An Australian-developed mobile app supported system that helps health systems identify and better manage people at high risk of cardiovascular disease has been shown to improve the use of appropriate medications and lower blood pressure in rural Indonesian communities. The study, published in JAMA Cardiology, showed that 15% of high […]
August 30, 2019

Artificial red blood cells enable research into malaria invasion

Researchers at the University of Bristol and Imperial College London have established a new model system that uses red blood cells grown in the laboratory to study how malaria parasites invade red blood cells. The work, which was funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS Blood and Transplant and is published in […]
August 30, 2019

Meet the alpacas that are helping researchers who study autism, Alzheimer’s and cancer

Alpacas aren’t the typical animals that drivers spot as they wind their way through rural Tennessee, but there’s a happy herd of them outside Waverly, where they eat the finest pellets, walk up and down a scenic hill and potentially save lives. They’re owned by a team of Vanderbilt University […]
August 30, 2019

An Apple a Day

Achieving or maintaining a healthy body weight is one key to preventing cardiovascular disease. But even experts don’t agree on the best way to achieve that goal, with some recommending eliminating carbohydrates and others emphasizing reducing fats to lose weight. Few studies have investigated the effects of these specific macronutrients […]
August 30, 2019

U of A researchers discover new biomarker for rare autoimmune disease

University of Alberta researchers identified a unique biological marker that can be used to identify the presence of the rare autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, predict the course of the disease and identify new, personalized treatments. In a study published in the journal Metabolomics, neurologist Zaeem Siddiqi, graduate student Derrick Blackmore and their […]
August 29, 2019

What we don't know about prenatal opioid exposure

Pregnancy can be a time of anxious uncertainty, particularly if there are any risks of complications. The question always arises, from parents, grandparents, friends and others: “Will the baby be OK?” In cases where the baby has been exposed to opioids in the womb, the answer is unclear. As part […]
August 29, 2019

Polycystic Kidney Disease: Strike Three

For people with polycystic kidney disease (PKD), life can be a never-ending cycle of symptoms: aches and pains, abdominal swelling, kidney stones, high blood pressure. The disease frequently leads, at worst, to a suite of major issues, including kidney failure, cysts in the liver and vascular problems, including strokes. PKD is a […]