Related Science News – Page 19 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

July 25, 2019

Heart cells’ environment a potentially major factor in heart disease

When it comes to heart disease, the health of the scaffold where cardiac cells grow may be a much bigger factor than previously believed. Stuart Campbell, associate professor of biomedical engineering & cellular and molecular physiology, led a team of researchers examined the effects of a diseased extracellular matrix (ECM) […]
July 24, 2019

The impact of genetics on motor neurone disease

Trinity College Dublin researchers have found that one in 347 men and one in 436 women can be expected to develop motor neurone disease during their lifetime. Motor neurone disease (MND) is a devastating condition which causes progressive paralysis, increasing physical disability and ultimately death within an average of two […]
July 24, 2019

For anemonefish, male-to-female sex change happens first in the brain

The anemonefish is a gender-bending marvel. It starts out as a male, but can switch to female when circumstances allow, for example, when the only female present dies or disappears. In a new study, researchers found that the male-to-female sex-change occurs first in the fish’s brain and only later involves […]
July 24, 2019

Researchers Map Protein-Gene Interactions Involved in Alzheimer’s Disease

Among the confounding challenges of diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the fact that patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic versions of the degenerative condition may share similar neuropathological burdens but experience significantly different rates of cognitive decline. In a new study, published in Cell Reports, a team led by […]
July 24, 2019

Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

It's long been known that people who suffer a major concussion can lose their sense of smell temporarily and also develop affective problems, such as anxiety and depression. Now scientists have found that's true even for people who get a minor concussion. Falling off a bike with a helmet on, […]
July 24, 2019

A New Cancer Drug, Thanks to a New Approach

The newest cancer treatment on the market owes something to one of the earliest advocates for modern science. In his work Novum Organum, which is widely credited with introducing the scientific method, Francis Bacon wrote of the need for creative thinking to achieve anything new, saying that it would be a […]
July 24, 2019

Diabetic Wound Care: New Discovery Points Toward Possible Treatment for Non-Healing Wounds

For the average person, getting a cut or scrape on the foot may not be cause for immediate concern. However, for people with type 2 diabetes, these wounds can be life-threatening. According to a 2016 study, one-third of the cost of type 2 diabetes treatment is related to non-healing diabetic foot wounds […]
July 24, 2019

Keeping livestock in the yard just might help your baby’s immune system

Getting up close – and a little dirty – with farm animals just might help us fend off illness, say researchers who’ve further demonstrated the benefits of early exposure to a wide variety of environmental bacteria. Scientists from The Ohio State University found that bacteria and other microbes from rural […]
July 24, 2019

Study: Fat Cells Play Key Role in Dangerous Transformation of Melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Carmit Levy and Dr. Tamar Golan of the Department of Human Genetics and Biochemistry at TAU's Sackler School of Medicine, have discovered that fat cells are involved in the transformation that melanoma cells undergo from cancer cells of limited growth in the epidermis to lethal metastatic cells attacking patients' […]
July 23, 2019

New approach to reducing damage after a heart attack

During the emergency procedure used to reopen the blocked artery causing a heart attack, smaller “micro” blood vessels can remain constricted causing significant damage. A new study led by Associate Professor Neil Herring and published in the European Heart Journal has established a key cause behind this constriction and identified […]
July 23, 2019

Evolutionary Gene Loss May Help Explain Why Only Humans are Prone to Heart Attacks

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say the loss of a single gene two to three million years ago in our ancestors may have resulted in a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in all humans as a species, while also setting up a further risk for […]
July 23, 2019

More Harm Than Good?

Studies: widespread aspirin use has few benefits, high risk. Medical consensus once supported daily use of low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke in people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. But in 2018, three major clinical trials cast doubt on that conventional wisdom, finding few benefits and consistent […]
July 23, 2019

Beyond finding a gene

Families living with extremely rare neurodegenerative diseases finally received an answer to the cause of their illnesses, thanks to a researcher’s hunch and decades of improvements in DNA sequencing technology. Four different rare diseases are all caused by the same short segment of DNA repeated too many times, a mutation […]
July 23, 2019

Allergy, Asthma Risk Are Increased by Microbial Compound in Infant Gut

A study of newborn infants has identified a compound produced by gut bacteria that appears to predispose certain infants to allergies and asthma later in life. “We have discovered a specific bacterial lipid in the neonatal gut that promotes immune dysfunction associated with allergic asthma and can be used to […]
July 22, 2019

Martian Gravity

Fifty years ago this month, the Apollo 11 mission landed on the moon, and the first human being took “one small step” onto its surface. Now, the buzz is around getting humans to Mars, and, according to a new report on research in rats published in Frontiers in Physiology, the first […]
July 22, 2019

Researchers wirelessly manipulate gene, step toward reprogramming the human genome

A new University at Buffalo-led study supported by NSF describes how researchers wirelessly controlled FGFR1 — a gene that plays a key role in how animals grow from embryos to adults — in lab-grown brain tissue. The ability to manipulate the gene, the study's authors say, could one day lead to […]
July 22, 2019

Targeting old bottleneck reveals new anticancer drug strategy

The enzyme ribonucleotide reductase is a bottleneck for cancer cell growth. Scientists at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have identified a way of targeting ribonucleotide reductase that may avoid the toxicity of previous approaches, informing focused drug discovery efforts. The results were published in Nature Communications. Ribonucleotide reductase controls […]
July 22, 2019

Alzheimer's gene may impact cognition before adulthood

A gene linked to Alzheimer’s disease may impact cognitive health much sooner than previously realized. The APOE gene creates a protein, apolipoprotein E, which packages cholesterol and other fats to transport them through the bloodstream. There are three versions, or alleles, of APOE. One of those is the APOE4 allele, […]
July 22, 2019

Penn Engineers’ ‘LADL’ Uses Light to Serve Up On-demand Genome Folding

Every cell in your body has a copy of your genome, tightly coiled and packed into its nucleus. Since every copy is effectively identical, the difference between cell types and their biological functions comes down to which, how and when the individual genes in the genome are expressed, or translated […]
July 22, 2019

Modern maker trend could spur aging brains

Frustrated that her sweater got lost in the community laundry, 92-year-old Gigi took advantage of an embroidery machine to label two others. Jewelry lover Betty had been reluctant to wear her fine necklaces, fearful they would get tangled in the tubes of her oxygen mask, so the 96-year-old found a […]
July 19, 2019

Link between diabetes and heart failure stronger in women than men

Researchers from The George Institute for Global Health determined that this differential was greater in type 1 than type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is associated with a 47% excess risk of heart failure in women compared to men, whilst type 2 diabetes has a 9% higher excess risk of […]
July 19, 2019

More cancer patients get help to quit smoking

When patients who smoke begin cancer treatment at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis — or at any of Siteman’s satellite locations — they also now receive advice about quitting smoking, referrals to easy-access smoking-cessation services and, if suitable, prescriptions for medications that […]
July 19, 2019

Omega-6 fatty acid could help prevent heart disease

An omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid has the potential to help fight heart disease, finds a new study by researchers at Cardiff University in collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. With funding from the British Heart Foundation, the team found that dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA), an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid, could […]
July 18, 2019

New Analysis Finds Vast Majority of Dietary Supplements to have no Effect on Heart Disease and Overall Lifespan

A massive new analysis published on 8 July in the Annals of Internal Medicine, which included findings from 277 randomised clinical trials using 24 different interventions (and a total of 992,129 subjects from around the world), has found almost all vitamin, mineral, and other dietary supplements, as well as most […]
July 18, 2019

Unmasking mutant cancer cells

As cancer cells progress, they accumulate hundreds and even thousands of genetic and epigenetic changes, resulting in protein expression profiles that are radically different from that of healthy cells. But despite their heavily mutated proteome, cancer cells can evade recognition and attack by the immune system. Immunotherapies, particularly checkpoint inhibitors […]
July 18, 2019

Eisai Presents Research Evaluating Correlation of Highly-Precisely Measured Amyloid Beta in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid

Eisai Co.,Ltd. announced its latest research on evaluation about correlation of amyloid beta (Abeta) in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by high precision measurement with the newly developed automated protein assay system, jointly developed with Sysmex Corporation, using fullautomated immunoassay system HISCLTM(1) series for creating the simplified diagnosis of […]
July 18, 2019

Can We Separate Living Longer From Living Healthier?

Aging research indicates that better healthspan—the quality of life as we age—may be more important than lifespan. In a report published in Nature Communications, a surprising new genetic discovery by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh suggests that there may be molecular switches that control […]
July 18, 2019

Using Marijuana to Treat Glaucoma

Marijuana increased in popularity in the mid-1970s when there was interest in cannabinoids for reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP), which is the fluid pressure inside the eye. Now, its usage has increased due to its pleasure-inducing side effects, and behind tobacco, alcohol and caffeine, it is the most widely used […]
July 18, 2019

Researchers present first clinical proof that individual genotypes determine if Alzheimer's disease drugs will work

University at Buffalo researchers have determined that a human gene present in 75% of the population is a key reason why a class of drugs for Alzheimer’s disease seemed promising in animal studies only to fail in human studies. The researchers say the work suggests that in different Alzheimer’s disease […]
July 18, 2019

Can gut infection trigger Parkinson’s disease?

A new study by Montreal scientists published today in Nature demonstrates that a gut infection can lead to a pathology resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD) in a mouse model lacking a gene linked to the human disease. This discovery extends recent work by the same group suggesting that PD has a […]