Related Science News – Page 30 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

July 8, 2019

Tiny change has big effects, reverses prediabetes in mice

A small chemical change — shifting the position of two hydrogen atoms — makes the difference between mice that are healthy and mice with insulin resistance and fatty liver, major risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. Making the change prevented the onset of these symptoms in mice fed a […]
July 8, 2019

Immune-boosting compound makes immunotherapy effective against pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is especially challenging to treat – only eight percent of patients are still alive five years after diagnosis. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are of limited benefit, and even immunotherapy – which revolutionized treatment for other kinds of cancer by activating the body’s immune system to attack cancer cells – […]
July 8, 2019

One Simple Change Cut Unnecessary Imaging for Cancer Patients in Half

Simply introducing a default physician order — a “nudge” — into electronic health records (EHRs) cut the use of unnecessary daily imaging in half during palliative radiation therapy sessions for patients with advanced cancer, according to a Penn Medicine study published in JAMA Oncology. While daily imaging is typically used […]
July 8, 2019

Scientists Discover Autoimmune Disease Associated with Testicular Cancer

Using advanced technology, scientists at Chan Zuckerberg (CZ) Biohub, Mayo Clinic and UC San Francisco, have discovered an autoimmune disease that appears to affect men with testicular cancer. Called “testicular cancer-associated paraneoplastic encephalitis,” the disease causes severe neurological symptoms in men. They progressively lose control of their limbs, eye movements, […]
July 5, 2019

Discovery of mechanism behind precision cancer drug opens door for more targeted treatment

New research that uncovers the mechanism behind the newest generation of cancer drugs is opening the door for better targeted therapy. PARP inhibitors are molecular targeted cancer drugs used to treat women with ovarian cancer who have the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations. The drugs are showing promise in late-stage […]
July 5, 2019

Smaller operational margins just as safe in high-risk melanoma

The standard treatment for aggressive skin cancer is to surgically remove the tumour. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now show that a 2 cm operational margin is sufficient, as opposed to the close to 4 cm margin previously applied by surgeons. For the study, which is published in The […]
July 5, 2019

Scientists hijack bacteria's homing ability

In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease, which causes more than a quarter of all deaths in […]
July 5, 2019

Genes could play a role in tooth decay and gum disease

Tooth decay and gum disease impact on illness and healthcare spending, yet the role of genetics in dental problems is largely unknown. New research led by an international team, including researchers at the University of Bristol, suggests hereditary traits and factors such as obesity, education and personality could play a […]
July 4, 2019

Scientists confirmed goat milk formula to be closer to human breast milk

Getting mom’s milk is extremely important for babies. It is not only nutrition, but also immunity benefits and ability to heal and recover quicker. However, a lot of babies are nowadays fed with formula. It is a convenient way to maintain a healthy and growing child. Now scientists say that […]
July 4, 2019

Saving Beethoven Mice

Scientists at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital have used a novel gene-editing approach to salvage the hearing of mice with genetic hearing loss and succeeded in doing so without any apparent off-target effects as a result of the treatment. The animals—known as Beethoven mice—were treated for the same […]
July 4, 2019

Treatment target pinpointed for liver cancer in young adults

New findings show how a genetically aberrant, fused protein promotes a rare form of liver cancer in adolescents and young adults. The researchers also saw that a certain mix of drugs could target the fused protein and the enzymes that it recruits.  In the lab, this drug combination slowed down […]
July 4, 2019

Scientists find thirdhand smoke affects cells in humans

Thirdhand smoke can damage epithelial cells in the respiratory system by stressing cells and causing them to fight for survival, a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found. The finding could assist physicians treating patients exposed to thirdhand smoke. “Our data show that cells […]
July 4, 2019

Simpler name for cancer genetic syndrome could save lives

As medical science links certain genetic mutations with a greater variety of cancers, the names for these risk syndromes are falling out of step. It’s more than just a name. These outdated designations could keep the tests from being offered to many people and families whose health is at stake […]
July 4, 2019

NIH study finds long-term increased risk of cancer death following common treatment for hyperthyroidism

Findings from a study of patients who received radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment for hyperthyroidism show an association between the dose of treatment and long-term risk of death from solid cancers, including breast cancer. The study, led by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of […]
July 3, 2019

Tapping into the Way Cells Communicate

A new technology discovered by a team including UConn School of Dental Medicine researchers records cellular communication in real time – providing a closer look into the dynamics of cell secretion and a greater understanding of how cells repair tissue. Kshitiz, an assistant professor (who goes by just his first […]
July 3, 2019

Perfectly punctual or fashionably late, it takes all kinds of stem cells to build a kidney

Arriving early or late can have big consequences for early-stage cells that gather to form a new kidney, USC researchers discovered. The scientists showed how progenitor cells that form the kidney’s filtering units, called nephrons, mature into entirely different types of cells based on when they reach the scene of […]
July 3, 2019

Certain cells secrete a substance that may head off Alzheimer’s

USC researchers have discovered a secret sauce in the brain’s vascular system that preserves the neurons needed to keep dementia and other diseases at bay. The finding, in a mouse model of the human brain, focuses on a specific cell called a pericyte and reveals that it plays previously unknown […]
July 3, 2019

Stem cells moonlight to protect the stomach from bacterial invaders

Our mucosal surfaces are constantly exposed to numerous bacterial species, some of which can induce DNA damage in host cells. Normally this remains inconsequential, as the rapid turnover of the mucosa means damaged cells are shed within days. However, if the long-lived stem cells that continually give rise to new […]
July 3, 2019

Neutral evolution shapes lifespan and ageing

Different African killifish species vary extensively in their lifespans – from just a few months to several years. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne investigated how different lifespans have evolved in nature and discovered a fundamental mechanism by which detrimental mutations accumulate in the […]
July 3, 2019

Scientists identify interactions that stabilize a protein associated with neurodegeneration

Understanding the normal molecular interactions could aid in the development of therapeutics to prevent the formation of clumps associated with ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Most of the well-studied proteins in our bodies are like metal; some can change shape easily, like aluminum foil, and others are rigid, like steel beams, […]
July 3, 2019

Protein Clumps in ALS Neurons Provide Potential Target for New Therapies

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological condition that affects motor neurons — the nerve cells that control breathing and muscles. Under a microscope, researchers have noticed that the motor neurons of patients with ALS contain excessive aggregation of a protein called TDP-43. Since TDP-43 proteins stuck in these aggregates […]
July 3, 2019

Competition leads to fathers who produce more male sperm

New research led by The University of Western Australia has shown that the social conditions that a male experiences while growing up can influence the amount of X and Y chromosome sperm that he produces as an adult. The findings, published in Evolution Letters, provide insight into how exposure to […]
July 3, 2019

Study reveals roots of Parkinson's in the brain

Researchers from King’s College London have uncovered the earliest signs of Parkinson’s disease in the brain, many years before patients show any symptoms. The results, published in The Lancet Neurology, challenge the traditional view of the disease and could potentially lead to screening tools for identifying people at greatest risk. […]
July 3, 2019

Three-dimensional model illuminates key aspects of early development

From a biological standpoint, the earliest stages of life are the most mysterious. A developing human embryo undergoes a flurry of rapid changes, and these changes are exceedingly difficult to study because they transpire within the confines of a womb. But with new technology, it might soon be possible to […]
July 3, 2019

Size Matters: New Data Reveals Cell Size Sparks Genome Awakening in Embryos

Transitions are a hallmark of life. When dormant plants flower in the spring or when a young adult strikes out on their own, there is a shift in control. Similarly, there is a transition during early development when an embryo undergoes biochemical changes, switching from being controlled by maternal molecules […]
July 3, 2019

A molecular link between memory and pain

Sortilin, which is a receptor expressed on the surface of nerve cells, plays a central role in memory and is now shown surprisingly also to be crucial in pain development in laboratory mice – and in all likelihood in humans as well. This is the main conclusion of the study […]
July 3, 2019

A Decade of Change: Advances in the Classification and Known Causes of Brain Tumors

For many years, the classification of gliomas relied largely on the cells’ general appearance, or histological characteristics, as seen under a microscope. Today, our understanding of glioma subtypes has expanded to include the molecular and genetic variants that can influence a tumor’s development, prognosis, and response to treatment. Until recently, […]
July 3, 2019

New study challenges claim that exogenous RNA is essential for sperm function

Scientists from the University of Bath are challenging the claims of two high profile papers from 2018 which reported that in the mouse, RNA has to be added to sperm for them to be fully fertile. The Bath findings undermine a proposed mechanism of epigenetic inheritance in which offspring inherit […]
July 3, 2019

Copper compound shows further potential as therapy for slowing ALS

A compound with potential as a treatment for ALS has gained further promise in a new study that showed it improved the condition of mice whose motor neurons had been damaged by an environmental toxin known to cause features of ALS. ALS patients are categorized either as familial – meaning […]
July 3, 2019

Decoding Cells to Unlock Stem Cells' Potential

Stem cells are jacks of all trades, capable of alleviating the consequences of such diverse pathologies as heart attacks, strokes and cancer. However, stem cell therapies have been hampered by possible side effects, which are frequently hard to predict. One way around this conundrum is to understand how stem cells […]