Related Science News – Page 37 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

July 23, 2020

Starve the Cancer

Fighting cancer often means employing a suite of techniques to target the tumor and prevent it from growing and spreading to other parts of the body. It’s no small feat — the American Cancer Society predicts roughly 1.8 million new cases of cancer in the country in 2020, underscoring the […]
July 22, 2020

Salmonella biofilm protein causes autoimmune responses—possible link with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s

Scientists from the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and Temple University in Philadelphia, Penn., have demonstrated that a salmonella biofilm protein can cause autoimmune responses and arthritis in animals. Salmonella was previously thought to only form biofilms in the environment, such […]
July 22, 2020

New bioink for cell bioprinting in 3D

A research group led by Daniel Aili, associate professor at LiU, has developed a bioink to print tissue-mimicking material in 3D printers. The scientists have developed a method and a material that allow cells to survive and thrive. “Bioprinting is a new and exciting technology to manufacture three-dimensional tissue-mimicking cell […]
July 22, 2020

Study of Gene’s Hormone Effects Leads to Surprise Insight into Pituitary Tumors

Rathke’s cleft cysts are benign, fluid-filled growths that develop in the pituitary gland, a small oval-shaped gland near the underside of the brain. Usually, these cysts don’t cause symptoms.  However, if they become large enough to compress the organ and surrounding tissues, then they can cause problems with vision and […]
July 22, 2020

When many act as one, data-driven models can reveal key behaviors

Biology is rife with examples of collective behavior, from flocks of birds and colonies of bacteria to schools of fish and mobs of people. In a study with implications from oncology to ecology, researchers from Rice University and the University of Georgia have shown that data science can unlock subtle […]
July 22, 2020

Rare Mutation of TP53 Gene Leaves People at Higher Risk for Multiple Cancers

Rare inherited mutations in the body’s master regulator of the DNA repair system – the TP53 gene – can leave people at a higher risk of developing multiple types of cancer over the course of their lives. Now, for the first time, a team led by researchers in the Basser Center for BRCA at […]
July 22, 2020

Older Adults Who Can Really Smell the Roses May Face Lower Likelihood of Dementia

Seniors who can identify smells like roses, turpentine, paint-thinner and lemons, and have retained their senses of hearing, vision, and touch may have half the risk of developing dementia as their peers with marked sensory decline. In a study by UC San Francisco, researchers tracked close to 1,800 participants in […]
July 22, 2020

Study reveals intricate details about Huntington’s disease protein

A new study reveals intricate details about the biology of the huntingtin protein (HTT), which is responsible for Huntington’s disease. The research focuses on axonal transport — the way in which vital materials travel along pathways called axons inside nerve cells, or neurons. Scientists found that HTT sometimes journeys along these […]
July 22, 2020

New diagnostic test for heart failure patients could also help COVID-19 patients: U of A researchers

A new blood test that reliably predicts outcomes for heart failure patients could lead to new diagnostics and treatments for COVID-19 patients as well, according to newly published research from cardiologists at the University of Alberta. The researchers examined circulating angiotensin peptide levels in the blood of 110 people who were experiencing […]
July 22, 2020

Dramatic Effect

Preliminary findings from Harvard Medical School researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear may pave the way for trials to test bone density medications for hearing loss. Hearing loss caused by damaged nerves, whether from sound exposure or aging, is irreversible. There are currently no medications approved by the Food and […]
July 22, 2020

Upending the Dogma

In a new study of human ear tissues, hearing scientists at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Eye and Ear have demonstrated that age-related hearing loss, also called presbycusis, is mainly caused by damage to hair cells, the sensory cells in the inner ear that transform sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals […]
July 22, 2020

Shifting from Treatment to Prevention in Alzheimer’s Research

As the most common form of dementia and the sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S., Alzheimer's disease is not foreign to Americans. Many of us know someone battling the disease— a disease that doctors are still continuing to understand. While the majority of previous research has been focused on treatment, researchers […]
July 22, 2020

Which jobs are more likely to give you knee osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis – the most common chronic joint condition, which causes joints to become painful and stiff. It’s been known for a long time that osteoarthritis is a somewhat of an occupational condition – people from some jobs are more likely to suffer from it. Now scientists the Universities of Sydney, […]
July 21, 2020

Decoding the Language of Cellular Messaging

Before the days of rote texting and email, if you wanted to communicate with a friend you might have personalized and assembled a physical letter. Similarly, the individual cells in our bodies communicate with each other by sending tailored “letters”—not with paper and pen, but in the form of proteins […]
July 21, 2020

Antidepressant does not improve post-stroke recovery

The antidepressant fluoxetine has been suggested as a means to improve brain recovery after acute stroke. However, a large randomized study on stroke patients at 35 Swedish hospitals shows that the drug has no such effect. The study, which was led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet, is published in The […]
July 21, 2020

“We think this type of tool will be quite useful to the community”

A group of researchers from the University of Toronto has developed a credit-card-sized tool for growing cancer cells outside the human body, which they believe will enhance their understanding of breast cancer metastasis. The device, described in a paper published in Science Advances, reproduces various environments within the human body where […]
July 21, 2020

Gene yields insights into the causes of neurodegeneration

Across the globe, approximately 50 million people are living with dementia. The two most common forms are Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which develop when neurons in specific parts of the brain stop functioning – triggering memory loss and other behavioral or personality changes. Without a cure, the […]
July 21, 2020

A mechanical way to stimulate neurons

In addition to responding to electrical and chemical stimuli, many of the body’s neural cells can also respond to mechanical effects, such as pressure or vibration. But these responses have been more difficult for researchers to study because there has been no easily controllable method for inducing such mechanical stimulation […]
July 21, 2020

Seemingly similar, two neurons show distinct styles as they interact with the same muscle partner

A study by MIT neuroscientists into how seemingly similar neuronal subtypes drive locomotion in the fruit fly reveals an unexpected diversity as the brain’s commands were relayed to muscle fibers. A sequence of experiments found a dramatic difference between the two nerve cells: One neuron scrambled to adjust to different […]
July 21, 2020

"Love Hormone" Oxytocin Could Be Used to Treat Cognitive Disorders Like Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease progressively degrades a person's memory and cognitive abilities, often resulting in dementia. Amid efforts to find novel treatments for this disease, a recent breakthrough study by scientists from Japan shows that oxytocin―the hormone that we commonly know to induce feelings of love and well-being―can also effectively reverse some […]
July 21, 2020

Data-driven resistance training against muscular atrophy

Researchers at ETH Zurich and ZHAW present a simple method to precisely map resistance exercise on machines and record missing comparative figures. This could help to develop optimized training strategies in the future, such as for age-associated muscular atrophy. Muscles play a critical role in life. Skeletal muscle mass alone […]
July 21, 2020

How good gut bacteria help reduce the risk for heart disease

Scientists have discovered that one of the good bacteria found in the human gut has a benefit that has remained unrecognized until now: the potential to reduce the risk of heart disease. The bacteria’s activity in the intestines reduces the production of a chemical that has been linked to the […]
July 21, 2020

Modeling neuronal cultures on 'brain-on-a-chip' devices

For the past several years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have made significant progress in development of a three-dimensional “brain-on-a-chip” device capable of recording neural activity of human brain cell cultures grown outside the body. Now, LLNL researchers have a way to computationally model the activity and structures of neuronal communities […]
July 20, 2020

Human Sperm Stem Cells Grown in Lab, an Early Step Toward Infertility Treatment

Infertility affects one in seven men of reproductive age worldwide. One idea for treating male sterility is spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) therapy. In this approach, sperm stem cells in the testis are transferred to a test tube, cultured and nudged into becoming fully fledged sperm. However, a key bottleneck has […]
July 20, 2020

Researchers Discover Two Paths of Aging and New Insights on Promoting Healthspan

Molecular biologists and bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have unraveled key mechanisms behind the mysteries of aging. They isolated two distinct paths that cells travel during aging and engineered a new way to genetically program these processes to extend lifespan. The research was described in the journal […]
July 20, 2020

Custom nanoparticle regresses tumors when exposed to light

A unique nanoparticle to deliver a localized cancer treatment inhibits tumor growth in mice, according to a team of Penn State researchers. The nanoparticles, developed by Daniel Hayes, associate professor of biomedical engineering, have a specific chemistry that allows a microRNA (miRNA) to attach to it. A miRNA is a […]
July 20, 2020

Molecular "Tails" Are Secret Ingredient for Gene Activation in Humans, Yeast, and Other Organisms

It might seem as though humans have little in common with the lowly yeast cell. Humans have hair, skin, muscles, and bones, among other attributes. Yeast has, well, none of those things. But besides their obvious differences, yeast, and humans, and much of life for that matter, have a great […]
July 20, 2020

Imaging Enzyme Activity with Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging, as most people are familiar with it, is used for taking pictures of a fetus while it is still inside the womb, but it has other medical purposes, such as diagnosing diseases of organs and tissues. For years, Caltech's Mikhail Shapiro has been working to extend ultrasound imaging into […]
July 20, 2020

Self-Eating Decisions

New study sheds light on how nutrient-starved cells recycle internal components. The idea of the cell as a city is a common introduction to biology, conjuring depictions of the cell’s organelles as power plants, factories, roads, libraries, warehouses and more. Like a city, these structures require a great deal of […]
July 20, 2020

Turning off “junk DNA” may free stem cells to become neurons

For every cell in the body there comes a time when it must decide what it wants to do for the rest of its life. In an article published in the journal PNAS, National Institutes of Health researchers report for the first time that ancient viral genes that were once […]