Related Science News – Page 6 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

December 17, 2019

Asthma severity linked to microbiome of upper airway

A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests there is a link between bacteria that live in the upper airway and the severity of asthma symptoms among children with mild to moderate asthma. The study raises the possibility that the airway’s microbiome could have […]
December 17, 2019

NIH launches first U.S. clinical trial of patient-derived stem cell therapy to replace dying cells in retina

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) are launching a clinical trial to test the safety of a novel patient-specific stem cell-based therapy to treat geographic atrophy, the advanced “dry” form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss among people age 65 and older. The geographic […]
December 17, 2019

Researchers discover critical link to controlling inflammation in Crohn’s disease

Investigators at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine discovered that blocking interleukin-1α (IL1α), a protein that controls inflammation in the gut markedly decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model of Crohn’s disease (CD). The anti-inflammatory effects of the biological therapies used to neutralize IL1α were […]
December 17, 2019

Simple tool shows life expectancy after dementia diagnosis

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and from the Netherlands have developed a simple tool that shows the survival probability of a person with dementia disease over three years. This, they hope, will facilitate dialogue with the most seriously affected and help doctors and others plan the necessary care. The study is […]
December 17, 2019

Free tool simplifies cancer research

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new method for identifying which proteins are affected by specific drugs. The tool and the results it has already generated have been made freely available online. The method is described in the scientific journal Nature Communications. Every cell contains a vast number of […]
December 17, 2019

A new gene therapy strategy, courtesy of Mother Nature

Scientists have developed a new gene-therapy technique by transforming human cells into mass producers of tiny nano-sized particles full of genetic material that has the potential to reverse disease processes. Though the research was intended as a proof of concept, the experimental therapy slowed tumor growth and prolonged survival in […]
December 17, 2019

Screen could offer better safety tests for new chemicals

It’s estimated that there are approximately 80,000 industrial chemicals currently in use, in products such as clothing, cleaning solutions, carpets, and furniture. For the vast majority of these chemicals, scientists have little or no information about their potential to cause cancer. The detection of DNA damage in cells can predict […]
December 16, 2019

Introducing the Targeted Anticancer Therapies and Precision Medicine in Cancer Collection

While the rate of death from cancer has been declining since the 1990s, an estimated 9.6 million people died from cancer in 2018, making it the second-leading cause of death worldwide [1]. According to the NCI Cancer Trends Progress Report, in the United States, the incidence and death rates of some […]
December 16, 2019

Chemists’ calculations may advance cancer prediction

When do cancer-prone cells turn into full-blown cancer? A Rice University scientist and his colleague believe there’s a way to know. It may become possible for biomarkers in the blood to reveal whether mutated cells have turned a corner toward forming tumors, and how long the process — depending on […]
December 13, 2019

Fragmented sleep may affect brain’s immune cells, impair cognition

Fragmented sleep in older people with and without Alzheimer’s disease may have an effect on the brain’s immune cells and impact people’s cognitive abilities, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers. The study by Dr. Andrew Lim, an associate professor in neurology at U of T’s Faculty of Medicine, […]
December 13, 2019

Genetic Variant Largely Found in Patients of African Descent Increases Risk for Heart Failure

New study, led by Penn Medicine, reveals that this genetic cause of heart failure, which is now treatable, is significantly underdiagnosed. A genetic variant in the gene transthyretin (TTR)—which is found in about 3 percent of  individuals of African ancestry—is a more significant cause of heart failure than previously believed, […]
December 13, 2019

Research Brief: Keeping health care workers safe from chemotherapy drugs

Chemotherapy drugs have been used to treat cancer since the 1950s. While the drugs are often lifesaving for cancer patients, they are also linked to reproductive problems, breast cancer, and other health issues in the medical staff who work with the medications. To help protect health care workers, the University […]
December 13, 2019

Study finds differences in energy use by immune cells in ME/CFS

New findings published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation suggest that specific immune T cells from people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) show disruptions in the way they produce energy. The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health. “This research gives us additional evidence for the role […]
December 13, 2019

Depression, anxiety may hinder healing in young patients with hip pain

New research suggests that physicians evaluating young patients with hip pain should consider more than such patients’ physical health. They also should consider screening those patients for clinical depression and anxiety — impairments that researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found can have a negative […]
December 13, 2019

Tropical flower offers potential new route for treating pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and deadly cancers. Following diagnosis, patients have an average survival of less than 6 months; sadly around 10,000 patients in the UK per year die from this type of cancer. Researchers from the University of Bath have made three new molecules similar […]
December 12, 2019

The Danger Behind Certain Biologics

Autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease plague tens of millions of Americans and are the result of the body’s immune system, whose role is to fight against disease-causing pathogens, turning against itself. Thankfully, several new drugs designed to fight these diseases are now available. The downside—the […]
December 12, 2019

Winship study sheds light on immune control of cancer

New findings could provide doctors with vital clues about how the immune system prevents cancer from recurring. The study from Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University looked at whether immune cells were present in tumor samples removed from patients with kidney and other urologic cancers. For those patients where the […]
December 12, 2019

Examining secondhand smoke and cardiovascular risks in children

New research from the University of Minnesota examines how secondhand smoke might impact children and adolescent cardiovascular health. Published in Pediatric Research, researchers studied the carotid artery in the neck, brachial artery in the upper arm and abdominal aorta right above the belly button in 298 people. All were between the […]
December 12, 2019

Flipping the script on novel cancer therapy leads to insights into lupus

In the last decade, scientists discovered that blocking a key regulator of the immune system helped unleash the body’s natural defenses against several forms of cancer, opening up a new era of cancer immunotherapy. Now Yale scientists have essentially flipped this script and found that when impaired a molecularly similar […]
December 11, 2019

Long-term study finds faster breast cancer radiation treatment as effective as longer course

A shorter course of higher-dose radiation treatment to part of the breast is showing promise in women with early-stage breast cancer who undergo breast conserving surgery, says a study led by Hamilton researchers. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) sees larger doses of radiation delivered to parts of the breast affected […]
December 11, 2019

Better Tools for Improved Understanding of Mitochondrial Polarisation in Stem Cells

Researchers from Sechenov University (Project 5-100 participant) and University College Cork (Ireland) developed a new method for studying mitochondrial polarisation in live cells and tissues. This approach enables studies of mitochondria in live cells, tissues and organoids and complements existing microscopy methods. The research was published in Cytometry Part A. […]
December 11, 2019

How extreme environmental conditions affect the human brain

Members of a polar research expedition have provided researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development with an opportunity to study the effects of social isolation and extreme environmental conditions on the human brain. The researchers found changes to the dentate gyrus, an area […]
December 11, 2019

Modifier Gene May Explain Why Some with Cystic Fibrosis are Less Prone to Infection

Cystic fibrosis is caused by an inherited mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Due to this mutation, the CFTR protein doesn’t embed in cell membranes to form a channel for chlorine ions the way it should. As a result, mucus-producing cells secrete a thicker-than-normal mucus that can create […]
December 11, 2019

The Sense of Meaning in Life Peaks at the Age 60, Study Finds

The concept of meaning as it pertains to human lives has been one of the cornerstones of philosophy for millennia. During the past three-or-so decades, however, it has also emerged as an important data point in medical research, especially when it comes to aging populations. As it turns out, far […]
December 11, 2019

Immunotherapy drug improves outcomes for some children with relapsed leukemia

New findings from a clinical trial show that treatment with the immunotherapy drug blinatumomab is superior to standard chemotherapy for children and young adults with high- or intermediate-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that has relapsed. Those treated with blinatumomab had longer survival, experienced fewer severe side effects, had a […]
December 11, 2019

Study finds association between poor diet, age-related macular degeneration

Participants who ate a diet high in red and processed meat, fried food, refined grains and high-fat dairy were three times more likely to develop an eye condition that damages the retina and affects a person’s central vision, according to the results of a study from the University at Buffalo. […]
December 11, 2019

Giving Common Antibiotic Before Radiation May Help Body Fight Cancer

The antibiotic vancomycin alters the gut microbiome in a way that can help prime the immune system to more effectively attack tumor cells after radiation therapy. A new study in mice from researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania found giving a dose of the common antibiotic not […]
December 11, 2019

Blood transfusions: fresh red cells no better than older ones

A new study led by the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Centre and the University of Montreal, along with the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, has found that transfusions using fresh red blood cell units—containing red cells that have spent seven days or less in storage—are no more beneficial […]
December 11, 2019

Common genetic link between autism and Tourette’s impairs brain communication

Lancaster University researchers have discovered, for the first time, how a genetic alteration that increases the risk of developing Autism and Tourette’s impacts on the brain. Their research published in the journal Cerebral Cortex also suggests that ketamine, or related drugs, maybe a useful treatment for both of these disorders. Autism affects […]
December 11, 2019

Less sleep linked to teen obesity, poor eating habits and low physical activity

Sleep can impact an individual’s health in many ways. University of Minnesota researchers were interested in how much teens sleep at night is related to their weight, eating habits and physical activity. Their findings were published in the journal Childhood Obesity. Using survey data from approximately 2,000 Twin Cities area ninth […]