Related Science News – Page 9 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

July 26, 2019

Microrobots Activated by Laser Pulses Show Promise For Treating Tumors

But often what ails us is inside the body and is not so easy to reach. In such cases, a treatment like surgery or chemotherapy might be called for. A pair of researchers in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science are working on an entirely new form of treatment—microrobots […]
July 26, 2019

How and Why Resistance Training Is Imperative for Older Adults

For many older adults, resistance training may not be part of their daily routine, but a new position statement suggests it is vital to improving their health and longevity. “When you poll people on if they want to live to 100 years old, few will respond with a ‘yes’,” says Maren Fragala, […]
July 26, 2019

FDA Finds Rare Lymphoma Linked with Breast Implants

Many women have breast implants with no serious complications, but textured implants manufactured by Allergan are now considered too risky for patients. Allergen announced a global recall of the macro-textured implants that have been linked to a rare type of cancer, breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The Food and […]
July 26, 2019

Mapping Cells in the Immortal Regenerating Hydra

The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have […]
July 26, 2019

Loneliness affects long-term brain function, according to new study

Using the zebra finch, a songbird, the researchers looked at the effects of short-term social isolation on measures related to long-term brain function and health. The results show that the experience of being alone has immediate consequences on brain gene activity. The researchers found that some of the changes are […]
July 26, 2019

Soft micro-monitors keep tabs on oxygen in new tissues

It’s important to know one’s new cells are getting nourishment. Rice University scientists are working on a way to tell for sure. The Rice lab of bioengineer Jane Grande-Allen has invented soft microparticle sensors to monitor oxygen levels in hydrogels that serve as scaffolds for growing tissues. Hydrogels being developed at Rice’s Brown […]
July 26, 2019

Biologists and mathematicians team up to explore tissue folding

As embryos develop, they follow predetermined patterns of tissue folding, so that individuals of the same species end up with nearly identically shaped organs and very similar body shapes. MIT scientists have now discovered a key feature of embryonic tissue that helps explain how this process is carried out so […]
July 26, 2019

Slowing metabolism can prevent detrimental effects of genetic mutations

Just by slowing their metabolism, mutant fruit flies can go from zero to hero. In a new Northwestern University study, researchers slowed mutant fruit flies’ metabolic rates by 50%, and the expected detrimental effects of many mutations never manifested. After experimentally testing fruit flies’ many different genetic mutations, the researchers […]
July 26, 2019

Like Film Editors and Archaeologists, Biochemists Piece Together Genome History

Old-school Hollywood editors cut out unwanted frames of film and patched in desired frames to make a movie. The human body does something similar—trillions of times per second—through a biochemical editing process called RNA splicing. Rather than cutting film, it edits the messenger RNA that is the blueprint for producing […]
July 25, 2019

MRI can help predicting the progression of multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a  demyelinating disease, characterized by the damage of the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain. There is no known cure for multiple sclerosis and long-term outcome is difficult to predict. MS is the most common immune-mediated disorder affecting the central nervous system with 2-2.5 million […]
July 25, 2019

Exposure to parasites may have greater negative effect than previously thought: study

The mere presence of parasites can have a negative effect on hosts, according to new research by University of Alberta parasitologists. The study, led by U of A associate professor Lien Luong, examined the effects on fruit flies living among parasitic mites. It found that flies exposed to, but not infected […]
July 25, 2019

Exploring genetic “dark matter,” researchers gain new insights into autism and stroke

With its elegant double helix and voluminous genetic script, DNA has become the of darling of nucleic acids. Yet, it is not all powerful. In order for DNA to realize its potential—for genes to become proteins—it must first be transcribed into RNA, a delicate molecule that requires intense care and […]
July 25, 2019

Alzheimer's protein is likely held together with many weak chemical interactions

The chemical interactions that give proteins their shape may be weaker and more numerous than previously recognized. These weak connections provide a new way for researchers to understand proteins that cause disease and help them gain insights into the fundamentals of chemistry. Chemists at the University of Tokyo modeled the […]
July 25, 2019

Taking out the Protein Garbage Becomes More Difficult as Neurons Age

Cells dispose of harmful “trash” through autophagy, a normal and necessary process in which aggregated proteins and dysfunctional structures are handled. If any part of this fails, waste builds up inside cells, eventually killing them. According to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, as […]
July 25, 2019

‘Limitless Potential’ of Artificial Protein Ushers in New Era of ‘Smart’ Cell Therapies

Medicine has a “Goldilocks” problem. Many therapies are safe and effective only when administered at just the right time and in very precise doses – when given too early or too late, in too large or too small an amount, medicines can be ineffective or even harmful. But in many […]
July 25, 2019

Designed switch allows unprecedented control over cells

Scientists have created the first completely artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify—or even commandeer—the cell’s complex internal circuitry. The switch is dubbed LOCKR, short for Latching, Orthogonal Cage/Key pRotein. Companion papers published in the journal Nature describe LOCKR’s design and demonstrate several practical applications of the […]
July 25, 2019

Heart cells’ environment a potentially major factor in heart disease

When it comes to heart disease, the health of the scaffold where cardiac cells grow may be a much bigger factor than previously believed. Stuart Campbell, associate professor of biomedical engineering & cellular and molecular physiology, led a team of researchers examined the effects of a diseased extracellular matrix (ECM) […]
July 24, 2019

The impact of genetics on motor neurone disease

Trinity College Dublin researchers have found that one in 347 men and one in 436 women can be expected to develop motor neurone disease during their lifetime. Motor neurone disease (MND) is a devastating condition which causes progressive paralysis, increasing physical disability and ultimately death within an average of two […]
July 24, 2019

For anemonefish, male-to-female sex change happens first in the brain

The anemonefish is a gender-bending marvel. It starts out as a male, but can switch to female when circumstances allow, for example, when the only female present dies or disappears. In a new study, researchers found that the male-to-female sex-change occurs first in the fish’s brain and only later involves […]
July 24, 2019

Researchers Map Protein-Gene Interactions Involved in Alzheimer’s Disease

Among the confounding challenges of diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the fact that patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic versions of the degenerative condition may share similar neuropathological burdens but experience significantly different rates of cognitive decline. In a new study, published in Cell Reports, a team led by […]
July 24, 2019

Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

It's long been known that people who suffer a major concussion can lose their sense of smell temporarily and also develop affective problems, such as anxiety and depression. Now scientists have found that's true even for people who get a minor concussion. Falling off a bike with a helmet on, […]
July 24, 2019

A New Cancer Drug, Thanks to a New Approach

The newest cancer treatment on the market owes something to one of the earliest advocates for modern science. In his work Novum Organum, which is widely credited with introducing the scientific method, Francis Bacon wrote of the need for creative thinking to achieve anything new, saying that it would be a […]
July 24, 2019

Diabetic Wound Care: New Discovery Points Toward Possible Treatment for Non-Healing Wounds

For the average person, getting a cut or scrape on the foot may not be cause for immediate concern. However, for people with type 2 diabetes, these wounds can be life-threatening. According to a 2016 study, one-third of the cost of type 2 diabetes treatment is related to non-healing diabetic foot wounds […]
July 24, 2019

Keeping livestock in the yard just might help your baby’s immune system

Getting up close – and a little dirty – with farm animals just might help us fend off illness, say researchers who’ve further demonstrated the benefits of early exposure to a wide variety of environmental bacteria. Scientists from The Ohio State University found that bacteria and other microbes from rural […]
July 24, 2019

Study: Fat Cells Play Key Role in Dangerous Transformation of Melanoma

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, led by Prof. Carmit Levy and Dr. Tamar Golan of the Department of Human Genetics and Biochemistry at TAU's Sackler School of Medicine, have discovered that fat cells are involved in the transformation that melanoma cells undergo from cancer cells of limited growth in the epidermis to lethal metastatic cells attacking patients' […]
July 23, 2019

New approach to reducing damage after a heart attack

During the emergency procedure used to reopen the blocked artery causing a heart attack, smaller “micro” blood vessels can remain constricted causing significant damage. A new study led by Associate Professor Neil Herring and published in the European Heart Journal has established a key cause behind this constriction and identified […]
July 23, 2019

Evolutionary Gene Loss May Help Explain Why Only Humans are Prone to Heart Attacks

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say the loss of a single gene two to three million years ago in our ancestors may have resulted in a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease in all humans as a species, while also setting up a further risk for […]
July 23, 2019

More Harm Than Good?

Studies: widespread aspirin use has few benefits, high risk. Medical consensus once supported daily use of low-dose aspirin to prevent heart attack and stroke in people at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. But in 2018, three major clinical trials cast doubt on that conventional wisdom, finding few benefits and consistent […]
July 23, 2019

Beyond finding a gene

Families living with extremely rare neurodegenerative diseases finally received an answer to the cause of their illnesses, thanks to a researcher’s hunch and decades of improvements in DNA sequencing technology. Four different rare diseases are all caused by the same short segment of DNA repeated too many times, a mutation […]
July 23, 2019

Allergy, Asthma Risk Are Increased by Microbial Compound in Infant Gut

A study of newborn infants has identified a compound produced by gut bacteria that appears to predispose certain infants to allergies and asthma later in life. “We have discovered a specific bacterial lipid in the neonatal gut that promotes immune dysfunction associated with allergic asthma and can be used to […]