Related Science News – Page 8 – Innovita Research

Related Science News

April 12, 2019

In cellular world, strong relationships the key to healing old wounds

Yale scientists with colleagues at University College London have taken the next step towards unravelling how cells work together during wound closure, a question that could be fundamental to determining optimal healing rates after injury or disease. How cells behave, the rate at which they repair skin tissue, and how […]
April 11, 2019

A New Role for Genetics in Cancer Therapy-Induced Cardiomyopathy

Recent advances in the development of cancer therapies have increased long-term survival and prognosis. However, the increased burden and prevalence of harmful side effects, including cardiomyopathy, have emerged alongside those therapeutic benefits. In particular, there have been increases in cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy (CCM) — a heart condition which may compromise […]
April 11, 2019

New tool helps find genetic culprits in cancer’s spread

The ability of cancer to establish itself in distant parts of the body — called metastasis — causes 90% of deaths from solid tumors. Metastasis is the result of complex genetic interactions that have proven difficult for scientists to study. Now Yale researchers have devised a way to identify some […]
April 11, 2019

Screening also prevents rare types of cervical cancer

Rare types of cervical cancer can be effectively prevented with screening, a comprehensive study of identified cases of rare cervical cancer over a ten-year period in Sweden concludes. The study was conducted by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and is published in The BMJ. The main aim of cervical screening is to […]
April 11, 2019

Long-lived Bats Appear to Hold Secrets of Mammal Longevity

University of Maryland researchers analyzed a DNA-based evolutionary tree for a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified for the first time two traits that predict extended life spans in bats. Their work is described in a research paper, published […]
April 11, 2019

New quantum material could warn of neurological disease

By speaking the brain’s language, the material is a portal between electronics and the brain. WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — What if the brain could detect its own disease? Researchers have been trying to create a material that “thinks” like the brain does, which would be more sensitive to early signs […]
April 10, 2019

Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy

Researchers find new way to clean up cells; discovery could aid attack on human disease. Marie Kondo herself couldn’t do it any better. Usually cells are good at recognizing what doesn’t spark joy. They’re constantly cleaning house — picking through their own stuff to clear out what no longer works. […]
April 10, 2019

New hope for treating childhood brain cancer

There could be new treatments on the horizon for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, a devastating form of brain cancer that afflicts young children and is currently incurable. Recent experiments in animal models of the disease have identified an experimental drug that effectively destroys DIPG cells. And a team […]
April 10, 2019

Brain Alterations Make It Difficult for Parkinson’s Disease Patients to Turn While Walking

The ability to turn while walking is impaired among patients with Parkinson's disease. This difficulty is also associated with freezing of gait and falls, which can have devastating medical consequences in an older population. A new Tel Aviv University study advances the understanding of turns in Parkinson's patients, providing new insights into […]
April 9, 2019

This New Biochip Can Detect Beginning Stages of Disease in Your Body

Some of the deadliest cancers have mostly silent symptoms. By the time people go to their doctors because of worrisome changes, cancer may have already reached a late stage, giving physicians limited treatment options. Scientists are always looking for ways to detect cancer and other diseases through tests that show […]
April 9, 2019

A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

Leukemia treatments often leave girls infertile, but a procedure developed by researchers at the University of Michigan working with mice is a step toward restoring their ability to be biological mothers. Ovarian follicles are the “nests” that carry eggs and support them to grow and become viable. The researchers demonstrated […]
April 9, 2019

New formula better predicts speed of tumor growth in 12 cancers

University at Buffalo researchers have developed a new method to more accurately predict tumor growth rates, a crucial statistic used to schedule screenings and set dosing regimens in cancer treatment. The mathematical method successfully estimated the doubling time — the amount of time for a tumor to double in size […]
April 9, 2019

Robots created with 3D printers could be caring for those in golden years

Purdue University researchers have developed a new design method to create soft robots that may help in caregiving for elderly family members. WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. – The world’s elderly population is booming. The number of older people — those age 60 years or older — is expected to more than […]
April 8, 2019

A New Biological Aging Clock: Ribosomal DNA

Chronological aging is easy to track – birthdays. Biological aging can be obvious too – graying hair, sagging skin, and other inexorable signs of impending decrepitude. But measuring biological aging isn’t as easy as noting the passage of time. The best-studied measure of biological age is the shrinking of chromosome tips, or telomeres, […]
April 8, 2019

Lifespan Links

Scientists have known for decades that caloric restriction leads to a longer lifespan. It has also been observed that chronic inflammation increases with age. But any relationship between the two had remained unexplored. But in a new study, published in Cell Metabolism,  Harvard Medical School researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have uncovered […]
April 8, 2019

Immunotherapy Kicks, Kills HIV by Exploiting a Common Virus

In a first on the quest to cure HIV, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health scientists report in EBioMedicine that they’ve developed an all-in-one immunotherapy approach that not only kicks HIV out of hiding in the immune system, but also kills it. The key lies in immune cells designed to recognize an […]
April 8, 2019

Witnessing the dance of RNAs around droplets of cellular degradation machinery

If a picture’s worth a thousand words, a video is perhaps worth much more. For the first time, scientists have observed a dynamic localization of a single RNA with processing bodies—the membraneless organelles present in the cytoplasm of nearly all mammalian cells that play an important role in RNA regulation. […]
April 8, 2019

DTU develops breast cancer scanning equipment

DTU has entered into collaboration with the UK company Kromek aimed at developing a scanner that can improve breast cancer diagnostics. Advanced technology developed for space research often has great potential in other fields. The new industrial research and development partnership between DTU Space and the UK company Kromek Group plc is a good […]
April 8, 2019

Older women have the highest risk of dying from cervical cancer

New research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital shows that women aged 65 and older have a higher risk of dying from cervical cancer than previously thought – although this age group is not covered by the Danish screening programme. Denmark has one of highest incidences of cervical cancer […]
April 8, 2019

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis, Management Improved by Brain Scans

A first-of-its-kind national study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer’s-related “plaques” significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. The study revealed that providing clinicians with the results of positron emission tomography (PET) scans that identify amyloid plaques in the brain […]
April 8, 2019

The Doctor and the Machine

A 49-year-old man notices a painless rash on his shoulder but doesn’t seek care. Months later, during a routine physical, his doctor notices the rash and diagnoses it as a benign skin condition. More time passes, and during a routine screening test, a nurse points out the rash to another […]
April 8, 2019

Mailing Colorectal Cancer Screening Kits Found Effective, Regardless of Financial Incentive

Colorectal cancer is the second deadliest cancer in the United States, and just six out of 10 adults in the age range recommended for routine screening—50 to 75—reported having it done in 2015. When patients do not keep up with screening, the risk of death is substantially higher, so Penn […]
April 5, 2019

Computational model of a human kinase may provide insights for cancer treatment

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers. The initiation and progression of cancer cells occur when molecular signals involved in cellular proliferation go awry. MEK1 plays an essential role in signaling within both healthy […]
April 5, 2019

Urine Test to Evaluate Immunotherapy Success Gets $1.8 Million NIH Research Grant

New immunotherapies can dramatically defeat cancer. But more often, cancer evades them, and doctors need to know quickly when that happens, so they can adjust treatment. An experimental urine test to detect immunotherapy effectiveness very early has received a major funding boost. The National Institutes of Health has granted $1.8 […]
April 5, 2019

Scientists prod immune cells to attack pancreatic cancer

It's possible to prod immune cells to attack and kill pancreatic cancer cells, according to a report from scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.  Their findings challenge the commonly held view that pancreatic cancer does not elicit an immune system response that […]
April 5, 2019

Scientists create world’s first gene-edited lizards

A group of University of Georgia researchers led by geneticist Douglas Menke has become the first in the world to successfully produce a genetically modified reptile—specifically, four albino lizards—using the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool. The team’s results, which appeared online, have been submitted for peer review. “Reptiles are very understudied in terms […]
April 4, 2019

How Immune Cells Help Tumors Escape Body's Defenses

New research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the UPMC Hillman Cancer Center sheds light on how tumors use the body’s regulators of immunity for their own benefit. Published in Nature Immunology, the findings could be used to develop the next generation of immune therapies to fight various cancers. “While cancer immunotherapy […]
April 4, 2019

Battle of the Bacteria: Study Identifies Possible Causes of and Protectors Against Premature Birth

Seven types of bacteria and certain immune factors in a woman’s vagina and cervix may be responsible for increasing the risk of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) or protect against it, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of […]
April 3, 2019

Metastatic prostate cancer may have its own biomarker, UB research finds

Prostate cancer can grow slowly and pose little threat to patients, or it can metastasize quickly, causing severe pain and death. But as of now, it’s nearly impossible to determine which type of cancer a patient has during the early stages. Now, University at Buffalo researchers and scientists from Moscow […]
April 3, 2019

Laser Technology Helps Researchers Scrutinize Cancer Cells

Devising the best treatment for a patient with cancer requires doctors to know something about the traits of the cancer from which the patient is suffering. But one of the greatest difficulties in treating cancer is that cancer cells are not all the same. Even within the same tumor, cancer […]